Saturday March 23, 2019

Breastfeeding May Reduce Hypertension Risk

For the study, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, researchers examined 3,119 non-smoking postmenopausal women aged 50 years or older in the 2010-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

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Evidence from epidemiologic data has also shown the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and their mothers. Pixabay
Evidence from epidemiologic data has also shown the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and their mothers. Pixabay
  • Women who breastfeed more children and for a longer duration were less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause
  • Evidence from epidemiologic data has also shown the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and their mothers
  • The study was published in the American Journal of Hypertension

Breastfeeding mothers, take note! New research suggests that women who breastfeed more children and for a longer duration were less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause.

According to the researchers, elevated blood pressure is the greatest single risk factor for disease and mortality.

“Our findings endorsed the current recommendations for breastfeeding for the benefit of maternal health in later lives,” said the lead author of the study, Nam-Kyong Choi from Ewha Woman’s University in South Korea.

ALSO READ: World Breastfeeding Week: Breast milk, the answer to malnutrition in children

Evidence from epidemiologic data has also shown the beneficial effects of breastfeeding on the health of infants and their mothers.

It has been well documented that long-term breastfeeding is associated with reduced children’s allergies, celiac disease, obesity, and diabetes mellitus, the researchers said.

However, the effects of breastfeeding on maternal health have been little studied compared with the effects on the children.

Several studies have consistently found that absence of breastfeeding or premature discontinuation was associated with increased risks of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease and cardiovascular diseases, the researchers mentioned. Pixabay
Several studies have consistently found that absence of breastfeeding or premature discontinuation was associated with increased risks of diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, metabolic syndrome, coronary heart disease and cardiovascular diseases, the researchers mentioned. Pixabay

 

For the study, published in the American Journal of Hypertension, researchers examined 3,119 non-smoking postmenopausal women aged 50 years or older in the 2010-2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

They found that breastfeeding of more children and for longer duration was associated with lower risk of hypertension in postmenopausal women.

ALSO READ: Breastfeeding of new-born babies during the first hour after birth is less than 50 percent in India

In particular, the highest quintile of a number of children breastfed (five to 11) showed a 51 percent lower risk of hypertension compared with the lowest quintile (zero to one).

The highest quintile of the duration of breastfeeding (96 to 324 months) showed a 45 percent lower risk of hypertension.

The researchers, however, said that this link may prove to be less true in obese women. (IANS)

Next Story

Childhood Maltreatment Strongest Risk Factor for Depression in Adulthood: Lancet

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome

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Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression. Pixabay

Facing trauma in childhood can significantly change the structure of the brain, which may result in severe depression which could even be recurrent in adulthood, say researchers.

The results from MRI scan images suggest that both childhood maltreatment and recurring depression are associated with similar reductions in the surface area of the insular cortex, part of the brain that regulates emotion and self-awareness.

This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal, which found childhood maltreatment one of the strongest risk factors for major depression in adulthood.

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Depression is among the leading causes of disability in the U.S. and is being closely monitored by health authorities amid rising suicides nationwide. Pixabay

“Given the impact of the insular cortex on brain functions such as emotional awareness, it’s possible that the changes we saw make patients less responsive to conventional treatments,” said lead researcher Nils Opel from the University of Munster in Germany.

The study included 110 patients aged 18 to 60 years. Of the 75 patients who experienced a relapse, 48 had experienced one additional episode, seven reported two episodes, and six experienced three episodes.

Fourteen had a remission period of less than two months and could therefore be regarded as having chronic depression.

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This reduction in the brain could make a future relapse more likely, said the study, published in The Lancet Psychiatry journal. Pixabay

ALSO READ: 4 Indian-American Teenagers Awarded for Inventions in Environmental Issues

The findings are to develop or improve risk-adapted interventions for people susceptible to a worse long-term clinical outcome.

Future psychiatric research should therefore explore how the findings could be translated into special attention, care and treatment that could improve patient outcomes, the study noted. (IANS)