Friday April 19, 2019

Britain urges people to reduce calories intake to 1600 a day

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Maintain the level of calories to 1600 a day by eating the right amount of portion of the healthy foods
Britain urges people to reduce calories intake to 1600 a day. wikimedia commons

London, Dec 28, 2017: In a bid to cut down obesity, men and women living in Britain are being urged to reduce their intake of calories to just 1,600 a day, according to new health guidelines.

The suggestions from Public Health England (PHE) — a government agency for preventing ill health — include 400 calories for breakfast, 600 for lunch and 600 for dinner and this does not include drinks, the Daily Mail reported. For those who follow this, 200 calories in form of snacks can be taken.

The new amount is below the current recommended daily intake of 2,000 calories for women and 2,500 for men.

The new calorie guidelines — the One You nutrition campaign — will be rolled out by PHE in March, and adults will be told to remember the “400-600-600” rule.

Officials are also in talks with coffee shop chains and supermarkets to promote healthy breakfast and lunch options within the limit.

“We can no longer hide behind the charade that having a takeaway or eating out is merely a treat. Adults consume 200 to 300 excess calories each day and this calorie creep is contributing to weight gain and other serious health conditions,” a PHE spokesman was quoted telling the Daily Mail.

“This is why we’re working with high street chains to offer healthier options through our reduction programmes and new One You nutritional campaign,” the spokesman added.

Obesity rates for British men and women are at 27% — the highest in any country in western Europe.

An average adult is overeating by 300 calories a day, and this so-called “calorie-creep” is leading to a steady weight gain, officials said.

The guidelines “is a panic measure to get the public to understand they are eating too much”, Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, was quoted as telling the Daily Mail.

“Portion sizes are getting bigger and bigger and people are mindlessly eating them just because they are there. The idea is sound because we are eating too much, but my feeling is the thresholds are too low,” Fry added.

However, the guidelines are merely a “rule of thumb” rather than strict limits, the government agency said.

Experts, on the other hand, have criticised the move. The calorie guidelines are “not based on evidence and are essentially a lie designed to manipulate people into eating less”, said Christopher Snowdon from the Institute of Economic Affairs think-tank. (IANS)

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Media Multitasking Can Be Associated With Risk of Obesity

The team measured proactive behaviours of compulsive or inappropriate phone use (like feeling the urge to check phone for messages, while talking to someone) as well as passive behaviours like media-related distractions that interfere with your work.

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The participants underwent an fMRI scan during which researchers measured brain activity, while people were shown a series of appetising but fattening foods' images. Pixabay

Do you keep switching between digital devices like smartphone, tablet and PC? Beware. A study has linked media multitasking to obesity.

The study showed that mindless switching between digital devices could be associated with increased susceptibility to food temptations and lack of self-control, which may cause weight gain.

“Increased exposure to phones, tablets and other portable devices has been one of the most significant changes to our environments in the past few decades, and this occurred during a period in which obesity rates also climbed in many places,” said lead author Richard Lopez, postdoctoral candidate from Rice University in the US.

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When media multitaskers saw pictures of food, the part of the brain dealing with food temptation became more active, said researchers. Pixabay

The research, published in the journal Brain Imaging and Behaviour, included 132 participants aged 18-23 years.

The team measured proactive behaviours of compulsive or inappropriate phone use (like feeling the urge to check phone for messages, while talking to someone) as well as passive behaviours like media-related distractions that interfere with your work.

The findings showed those with higher scores were associated with higher body mass index (BMI) and greater body fat percentage.

social media
The study showed that mindless switching between digital devices could be associated with increased susceptibility to food temptations and lack of self-control, which may cause weight gain. Pixabay

The participants underwent an fMRI scan during which researchers measured brain activity, while people were shown a series of appetising but fattening foods’ images.

Also Read: Congress To Come Up With “National Clean Air Programme” To Combat The Menace of Air Pollution in India

When media multitaskers saw pictures of food, the part of the brain dealing with food temptation became more active, said researchers.

Lopez said it was important to establish such links given the rising obesity and prevalence of multimedia use. (IANS)