Sunday November 18, 2018

Britain urges people to reduce calories intake to 1600 a day

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Maintain the level of calories to 1600 a day by eating the right amount of portion of the healthy foods
Britain urges people to reduce calories intake to 1600 a day. wikimedia commons
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London, Dec 28, 2017: In a bid to cut down obesity, men and women living in Britain are being urged to reduce their intake of calories to just 1,600 a day, according to new health guidelines.

The suggestions from Public Health England (PHE) — a government agency for preventing ill health — include 400 calories for breakfast, 600 for lunch and 600 for dinner and this does not include drinks, the Daily Mail reported. For those who follow this, 200 calories in form of snacks can be taken.

The new amount is below the current recommended daily intake of 2,000 calories for women and 2,500 for men.

The new calorie guidelines — the One You nutrition campaign — will be rolled out by PHE in March, and adults will be told to remember the “400-600-600” rule.

Officials are also in talks with coffee shop chains and supermarkets to promote healthy breakfast and lunch options within the limit.

“We can no longer hide behind the charade that having a takeaway or eating out is merely a treat. Adults consume 200 to 300 excess calories each day and this calorie creep is contributing to weight gain and other serious health conditions,” a PHE spokesman was quoted telling the Daily Mail.

“This is why we’re working with high street chains to offer healthier options through our reduction programmes and new One You nutritional campaign,” the spokesman added.

Obesity rates for British men and women are at 27% — the highest in any country in western Europe.

An average adult is overeating by 300 calories a day, and this so-called “calorie-creep” is leading to a steady weight gain, officials said.

The guidelines “is a panic measure to get the public to understand they are eating too much”, Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, was quoted as telling the Daily Mail.

“Portion sizes are getting bigger and bigger and people are mindlessly eating them just because they are there. The idea is sound because we are eating too much, but my feeling is the thresholds are too low,” Fry added.

However, the guidelines are merely a “rule of thumb” rather than strict limits, the government agency said.

Experts, on the other hand, have criticised the move. The calorie guidelines are “not based on evidence and are essentially a lie designed to manipulate people into eating less”, said Christopher Snowdon from the Institute of Economic Affairs think-tank. (IANS)

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Longer Exposure to Honking Traffic Makes You Obese

For the study, the researchers involved 3,796 adults and examined body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat, central obesity and overweight

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Traffic Kolkata, Wikimedia

Are you obese or overweight? Blame long term exposure to blaring horns and other noise from road traffic, said researchers.

The study showed that a 10 decibel (dB) increase in mean noise level was associated with a 17 per cent increase in obesity.

“Our analysis shows that people exposed to the highest levels of traffic noise are at greater risk of being obese” said Maria Foraster, lead researcher from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health in Spain.

It could be because noise generates stress and affects our sleep. It alters hormone levels and increases blood pressure.

Moreover, among other effects, sleep disturbance deregulates glucose metabolism and alters the appetite, the researchers explained in the paper published in the journal Environment International.

Long term exposure to honking traffic can make you obese. Flickr

“In the long term, these effects could give rise to chronic physiological alterations, which would explain the proven association between persistent exposure to traffic-related noise and cardiovascular disease or the more recently discovered associations with diabetes and obesity,” Foraster said.

“Our findings suggest that reducing traffic-related noise could also be a way of combating the obesity epidemic,” he noted.

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For the study, the researchers involved 3,796 adults and examined body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, body fat, central obesity and overweight.

They also analysed exposure to noise generated by aircraft and railway traffic and found no significant associations except in the case of long-term exposure to railway noise, which was associated with a higher risk of overweight but not of obesity. (IANS)