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British police Name 2 London Attackers who killed 7 people and wounded more than 50

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This undated handout photo provided by the London Metropolitan Police shows Khuram Shazad Butt and Rachid Redouane. VOA
  • British citizen Khuram Shazad Butt, 27 was one of the London Attackers 
  • The second attacker was identified as 30-year-old Rachid Reouane. Both men lived in the same area of East London
  • British Prime Minister Theresa May says police are also still working to determine the identities of all the victims

London, June 6, 2017: London Metropolitan police have named two of the three attackers who killed seven people and wounded more than 50 others Saturday.

British citizen Khuram Shazad Butt, 27, was previously known to authorities, but had not been viewed as a serious threat.

“There was no intelligence to suggest that this attack was being planned and the investigation had been prioritized accordingly,” police said in a statement.

The second attacker was identified as 30-year-old Rachid Reouane. Both men lived in the same area of East London, police said.

Police are continuing to investigate the identity of the third attacker.

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British Prime Minister Theresa May says police are also still working to determine the identities of all the victims, but that so far it is known they include people of several nationalities.

“This was an attack on London and the United Kingdom, but it was also an attack on the free world,” she said.

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan and Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick visit the scene of the attack on London Bridge and Borough Market which left 7 people dead and dozens of injured in central London, Britain, June 5, 2017.
Mayor of London Sadiq Khan and Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick visit the scene of the attack on London Bridge and Borough Market which left 7 people dead and dozens of injured in central London, Britain, June 5, 2017. VOA

London police carried out more raids Monday and detained “a number” of people during searches at locations in the Newham and Barking areas.

London mayor Sadiq Khan thanked the police in a statement Monday for “running toward danger” and risking their lives for civilian safety.

[bctt tweet=”The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack.” username=”NewsGramdotcom”]

“All of us pay tribute to the amazing work of the police and emergency service,” Khan said. “The speed of their response led to fewer lives being lost.”

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Police have said Saturday’s attack involved three men who were inside a van that struck pedestrians on London Bridge, then got out and stabbed numerous people at a nearby market area before being shot dead by police.

“We are trying to find out whether anybody was helping them and to understand the background to this attack as best as we possibly can,” Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick told Sky News.

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack through its Amaq news agency.

May said Sunday that three terrorist attacks in Britain in the last three months are “bound together by the evil ideology of Islamist extremism.”

There is “far too much tolerance for extremism in our country,” May said. “We need to be more robust in identifying and stamping out extremism in public service and across society…it’s time to say enough is enough.”

Police officers stand at a road block near a property in East Ham, east London, Britain, June 5, 2017.
Police officers stand at a road block near a property in East Ham, east London, Britain, June 5, 2017. VOA

No link to Manchester attack

May said Saturday’s attack does not appear to be connected to the a suicide bombing last month that killed 22 people after an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester or another attack on pedestrians on Westminster Bridge in March.

But she said “terrorism breeds terrorism” and that the perpetrators are “copying one another.”

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London Mayor Sadiq Khan condemned the attack saying, “There is no justification whatsoever for such barbaric acts.”

Farhad Ahmad, a London Imam, told Sky News “people need to be told that there is no support for this in Islam at all.”

Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates each issued statements condemning the attack and expressing support for Britain.

At a Mass marking Pentecost, the end of the Easter season, Pope Francis asked for prayers for the victims and their families. He also prayed for “peace to the whole world” and for the wounds of war and terrorism to be healed.

Commander Mak Chishty of the Metropolitan Police read a statement denouncing the attack on behalf of the London Muslim community Monday.

“The Muslim community appeals to all sections within their own communities to root out the scourge of terrorism which hides amongst their own people and masquerades as Islam,” he said.

Ariana Grande performs during the One Love Manchester benefit concert for the victims of the Manchester Arena terror attack at Emirates Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, in Britain, June 4, 2017.
Ariana Grande performs during the One Love Manchester benefit concert for the victims of the Manchester Arena terror attack at Emirates Old Trafford, Greater Manchester, in Britain, June 4, 2017. VOA

A moment of silence also was held in Manchester, where American pop singer Ariana Grande returned to headline an all-star concert to raise money for the victims of the May 22 suicide bombing.

Fifty-thousand people, including some who were wounded in the concert attack, attended the show, which raised more than $2.5 million. (VOA)

Next Story

U.S. President Donald Trump Announces Withdraw Of Almost All The Troops From Syria

Meanwhile, U.S. military officials, as well as members of the coalition actively fighting the terror group, have been reluctant to predict when final victory will be declared.

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President Donald Trump shows maps of Syria and Iraq depicting the size of the "ISIS physical caliphate" as he speaks to workers at the country's only remaining tank manufacturing plant, in Lima, Ohio, March 20, 2019. VOA

In late 2018, President Donald Trump announced the U.S. would withdraw almost all of its troops from Syria, saying the Islamic State terror group had been defeated and there was no longer a reason to deploy U.S. forces in the war-torn nation.

The announcement led to the resignation of former Secretary of Defense James Mattis, who reportedly felt the drawdown was premature.

In the months since Trump announced the defeat of IS, he has wavered on whether the group has been vanquished. Sometimes he predicted that total victory would come in hours or days, while other times he has doubled down on the claim that the IS threat has been eliminated.

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Trump declared, “We have won against ISIS,” in a video released by the White House, to explain why the U.S. was pulling most of its troops out of Syria. VOA

Here’s a chronology of claims concerning the demise of Islamic State.

Dec. 19, 2018 — Trump declared, “We have won against ISIS,” in a video released by the White House, to explain why the U.S. was pulling most of its troops out of Syria.

Dec. 22, 2018 — Trump tweets that “ISIS is largely defeated and other local countries, including Turkey, should be able to easily take care of whatever remains.”

Jan. 16, 2019 — Vice President Mike Pence declares in a speech at the State Department that “the caliphate has crumbled and ISIS has been defeated.” Earlier that day, four Americans were killed in Syria by an IS suicide bomber.

Jan. 30, 2019 — Trump tweets about the “tremendous progress” made in Syria and that the IS “Caliphate will soon be destroyed.”

Feb. 1, 2019 — Trump repeats that “We will soon have destroyed 100 percent of the Caliphate.”

Feb. 3, 2019 — Trump tells CBS News, “We will be announcing in the not too distant future 100 percent of the caliphate, which is the area — the land, the area — 100. We’re at 99 percent right now, we’ll be at 100.”

Feb. 6, 2019 — Trump predicts that the declaration that the coalition has captured all IS holdings “should be formally announced sometime, probably next week.”

Feb. 10, 2019 — Trump tweets that the U.S. will control all former IS territory in Syria “soon.”

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Feb. 16, 2019 — Trump tweets, “We are pulling back after 100 percent Caliphate victory!” Pixabay

Feb. 11, 2019 — At a rally in El Paso, Texas, Trump says the announcement that 100 percent of Islamic State territory has been captured will be coming “maybe over the next week, maybe less.”

Feb. 15, 2019 — At a news conference Trump says a statement about “our success with the eradication of the caliphate … will be announced over the next 24 hours.”

Feb. 16, 2019 — Trump tweets, “We are pulling back after 100 percent Caliphate victory!”

Feb. 22, 2019 — Trump tells reporters “In another short period of time, like hours — you’ll be hearing hours and days — you’ll be hearing about the caliphate. It will — it’s 100 percent defeated.”

Donald Trump
March 2, 2019 — At a conference, Trump tells attendees, “As of probably today or tomorrow, we will actually have 100 percent of the caliphate in Syria.” VOA

Feb. 28, 2019 — In a speech to U.S. troops in Alaska, Trump says, “We just took over, you know, you kept hearing it was 90 percent, 92 percent, the caliphate in Syria. Now it’s 100 percent we just took over, 100 percent caliphate.”

March 2, 2019 — At a conference, Trump tells attendees, “As of probably today or tomorrow, we will actually have 100 percent of the caliphate in Syria.”

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March 20, 2019 — Trump shows reporters a map that plots the territory still held by the Islamic State in Syria and promises that area “will be gone by tonight.”

Meanwhile, U.S. military officials, as well as members of the coalition actively fighting the terror group, have been reluctant to predict when final victory will be declared. Some also note that even when IS no longer controls any territory, fighters who escaped capture and are hiding within civilian populations could still pose a security threat. (VOA)