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British researchers discover a protein that can control spread of breast cancer in body

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London: British researchers have identified a key protein that can control how breast cancer cells spread in the body.

The study sheds light on how cancer cells leave the blood vessels to travel to a new part of the body, said the researchers from the University of Manchester in Britain.

When tumor cells spread, they first enter the blood stream and grip onto the inner walls of blood vessels, the researchers elicited.

The cancer cells control a receptor protein called EPHA2 in order to push their way out of the vessels, they added.

When these cancer cells interact with the walls of the blood vessels, EPHA2 is activated and the tumor cells remain inside the blood vessels. When the EPHA2 is inactive, the tumor cells can push out and spread, revealed the study published in the journal Science Signaling.

The researchers used a technique that allowed them to map how cancer cells interact and exchange information with cells that make up the blood vessels.

“The next step is to figure out how to keep this receptor switched on, so that the tumor cells can’t leave the blood vessels – stopping breast cancer spreading and making the disease easier to treat successfully,” concluded the lead researcher Claus Jorgensen from the University of Manchester. (IANS)

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Losing Weight Can Help Lower The Risk of Breast Cancer For Post-menopausal Women

"These findings, taken together, provide strong correlative evidence that a modest weight loss programme can impact breast cancer,"

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Photo: neqotkukhealthcenter.ca

Women, please take a note. Losing weight can help lower the risk of developing breast cancer in the post-menopausal stage, a new study has found.

The study, published in the journal CANCER, found that among post-menopausal women, participants who lost weight had a lower risk of developing invasive breast cancer than those who maintained or gained weight.

“Our study indicates that moderate, relatively short-term weight reduction was associated with a statistically significant reduction in breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women,” said co-author Rowan Chlebowski from the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California.

Although obesity has been strongly related to breast cancer risk, studies examining whether weight loss might reduce postmenopausal women’s risk have provided mixed results, the researchers said.

For the study, the research team analysed information on 61,335 women participating in the World Health Initiative Observational Study who had no prior history of breast cancer and had normal mammogram results.

Breast Cancer
Weight loss may lower breast cancer risk for post-menopausal women. Pixabay

The participant’s body weight, height and body mass index were assessed at the start of the study and again three years later.

The team found that during an average follow-up of 11.4 years, there were 3,061 new cases of invasive breast cancer diagnosed.

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“These are observational results, but they are also supported by randomised clinical trial evidence from the Women’s Health Initiative Dietary Modification trial where, in a randomised clinical trial setting, adopting a low-fat dietary pattern that was associated with a similar magnitude of weight loss resulted in a significant improvement in breast cancer overall survival,” Chlebowski said.

“These findings, taken together, provide strong correlative evidence that a modest weight loss programme can impact breast cancer,” he noted. (IANS)

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