Wednesday January 29, 2020

Brushing Teeth Frequently May Lower Risks of Heart Failure: Study

Brushing teeth 3 times a day can lower heart failure risk

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Brushing teeth
Brushing teeth is linked with improving the heart health. Lifetime Stock

Brushing teeth frequently is linked with lower risks of atrial fibrillation and heart failure, according to a new study.

Tooth brushing three or more times a day was associated with a 10 per cent lower risk of atrial fibrillation and a 12 per cent lower risk of heart failure during 10.5-year follow up, the research added.

The study, published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, enrolled 161,286 participants of the Korean National Health Insurance System aged 40 to 79 with no history of atrial fibrillation or heart failure.

“We studied a large group over a long period, which adds strength to our findings,” said study author Tae-Jin Song of Ewha Woman’s University in South Korea.

Previous research suggests that poor oral hygiene leads to bacteria in the blood, causing inflammation in the body.

Inflammation increases the risks of atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat) and heart failure (the heart’s ability to pump blood or relax and fill with blood is impaired).

This study examined the connection between oral hygiene and occurrence of these two conditions.

Brushing- oral health
Tooth brushing three or more times a day was associated with a 10 per cent lower risk of atrial fibrillation. Lifetime Stock

Participants underwent a routine medical examination between 2003 and 2004. Information was collected on height, weight, laboratory tests, illnesses, lifestyle, oral health, and oral hygiene behaviours.

During a median follow-up of 10.5 years, 4,911 (3.0 per cent) participants developed atrial fibrillation and 7,971 (4.9 per cent) developed heart failure.

The findings were independent of a number of factors including age, sex, socioeconomic status, regular exercise, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and comorbidities such as hypertension.

According to the researchers, while the study did not investigate mechanisms, one possibility is that frequent tooth brushing reduces bacteria living in the pocket between the teeth and gums, thereby preventing translocation to the bloodstream.

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It is certainly too early to recommend toothbrushing for the prevention of atrial fibrillation and congestive heart failure, the study said.

“While the role of inflammation in the occurrence of cardiovascular disease is becoming more and more evident, intervention studies are needed to define strategies of public health importance,” it added. (IANS)

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Eating an Egg Not Linked to Heart Diseases: Study

Eating an egg a day not bad for your heart

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Egg
Eating an egg a day is not linked to the risk of heart diseases. Pixabay

The controversy about whether eggs are good or bad for heart health may be solved, as health researchers have found that eating an egg a day is not linked to the risk of heart diseases.

The study from McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences, published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found the answer by analysing data from three large, long-term multinational studies.

“Moderate egg intake, which is about one egg per day in most people, does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or mortality even if people have a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes,” said study first author Mahshid Dehghan from McMaster University in Canada.

“Also, no association was found between egg intake and blood cholesterol, its components or other risk factors. These results are robust and widely applicable to both healthy individuals and those with vascular disease,” Dehghan added.

Egg
Moderate egg intake, which is about one egg per day in most people, does not increase the risk of cardiovascular disease or mortality even if people have a history of cardiovascular disease or diabetes. Pixabay

Although eggs are an inexpensive source of essential nutrients, some guidelines have recommended limiting consumption to fewer than three eggs a week due to concerns they increase the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Previous studies on egg consumption and diseases have been contradictory, according to the researchers.

For the findings, the researchers analysed three international studies conducted by the Population Health Research Institute (PHRI). Egg consumption of 146,011 individuals from 21 countries was recorded in the PURE study and in 31,544 patients with vascular disease from the ONTARGET and the TRANSEND studies.

The data from these three studies involved populations from 50 countries spanning six continents at different income levels, so the results are widely applicable, said the researchers.

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The results suggest there is no harm from consuming eggs. Given that the majority of individuals in the study consumed one or fewer eggs per day, it would be safe to consume this level, the researchers said.

“This is because most of these studies were relatively small or moderate in size and did not include individuals from a large number of countries,” said study researcher Salim Yusuf. (IANS)