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BSES Urges Consumers to Switch Off Electric Appliances During Earth Hour

Last year, BSES saved 183 MW in Delhi's total contribution of 305 MW during Earth Hour, it added

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Last year, BSES saved 183 MW in Delhi's total contribution of 305 MW during Earth Hour, it added. Pixabay

Delhi power distribution company (discom) BSES on Monday urged its over 40 lakh consumers to “switch off” their electric appliances during Earth Hour on March 30, 2019, to show their concern for the environment.

According to the company, consumers should show their concern for the environment by switching off their electrical appliances and non-essential lighting fixtures for one hour starting 8.30 p.m (local time) on Saturday. In this, Delhi citizens will be joining their over a billon counterparts in Mumbai, Los Angeles, London, Hong Kong, Sydney and Rome, among many other cities in over 180 countries, a statement said.

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The company further said that Earth Hour 2019 will also be the platform that launches the “Give Up to Give Back” movement. Wikimedia

The company further said that Earth Hour 2019 will also be the platform that launches the “Give Up to Give Back” movement, encouraging millions of Indians to give up wasteful practices, habits and lifestyles to give back to the planet that makes life possible.

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Commenting on the importance of a sustainable planet, a BSES spokesperson said: “As conscientious corporate citizens of Delhi, BSES urges its consumers to opt for paper-less bills, thus giving up paper waste.”

The BSES sister discoms “BRPL and BYPL will also switch off all non-essential lights at their over 400 offices, spread across an area of around 950 sq.kms, during the appointed hour (8.30 to 9.30 pm) on March 30,” the statement said. Last year, BSES saved 183 MW in Delhi’s total contribution of 305 MW during Earth Hour, it added. (IANS)

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This Is How The “Earth Hour 2019” Got Celebrated Across The Globe

“We are the first generation to know we are destroying the world,” WWF said. “And we could be the last that can do anything about it.”

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Earth Hour 2019. VOA

The Eiffel Tower, the Empire State Building, the Sydney Opera House, the Brandenburg Gate, the Acropolis and many more iconic landmarks went dark at 8:30 p.m. local time, Saturday night, for Earth Hour, an annual call for local action on climate change.

Earth Hour is the brain child of the World Wildlife Fund.

“By going dark for Earth Hour, we can show steadfast commitment to protecting our families, our communities and our planet from the dangerous effects of a warming world,” said Lou Leonard, WWF senior vice president, climate and energy. “The rising demand for energy, food and water means this problem is only going to worsen, unless we act now.”

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WWF said Earth’s “rich biodiversity, the vast web of life that connects the health of oceans, rivers and forests to the prosperity of communities and nations, is threatened.” VOA

Individuals and companies around the world participated in the hour-long demonstration to show their support for the fight against climate change and the conservation of the natural world.

WWF said Earth’s “rich biodiversity, the vast web of life that connects the health of oceans, rivers and forests to the prosperity of communities and nations, is threatened.”

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“The rising demand for energy, food and water means this problem is only going to worsen, unless we act now.” Pixabay

The fund also reports that wildlife populations monitored by WWF “have experienced an average decline of 60 percent in less than a single person’s lifetime, and many unique and precious species are at risk of vanishing forever.”

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“We have to ask ourselves what we’re willing to do after the lights come back on,” Leonard said. “If we embrace bold solutions, we still have time to stabilize the climate and safeguard our communities and the diverse wildlife, ecosystems and natural resources that sustain us all.”

“We are the first generation to know we are destroying the world,” WWF said. “And we could be the last that can do anything about it.” (VOA)