Monday September 23, 2019
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A Bug in Twitter Exposes Private Tweets of Some Android Users

Twitter is also facing an investigation by privacy regulators in Ireland over data collection in its link-shortening system

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Twitter
New Twitter bug exposed Android users' private tweets. Pixabay

A bug in Twitter exposed private tweets of some Android users for over five years when they made changes in their settings, like changing the email address linked to their accounts.

According to the micro-blogging platform, the bug (now fixed) disabled the “Protect your Tweets” setting if certain account changes were made on Android devices.

The bug didn’t affect people using Twitter on iOS or desktop, Twitter said on Thursday.

“You may have been impacted by this issue if you had protected Tweets turned on in your settings, used Twitter for Android, and made certain changes to account settings such as changing the email address associated with your account between November 3, 2014, and January 14, 2019.

“People on iOS or the web were not impacted. We fixed the issue on January 14, and we’ll provide updates if other important information becomes available,” Twitter said on its Help page.

The company said it has informed those who were affected by the bug, and has turned “Protect your Tweets” back on for them if it was disabled.

Twitter CEO
Twitter on a smartphone device. VOA

“We encourage you to review your privacy settings to ensure that your aProtect your Tweets’ setting reflects your preferences,” said Twitter, adding it is sorry that this happened.

In May last year, Twitter asked its 336 million users to change their passwords after it discovered a bug that stored passwords in plain text in an internal system.

Twitter said it found no sign that hackers accessed the exposed data but advised users that they should enter a new password on all services where their current password has been used.

Also Read- Android ‘Q’ Expected to Bring System-wide ‘Dark Mode’

Another bug in Twitter’s platform for third-party app developers exposed some Direct Messages (DMs) from nearly 3 million users to outsiders, the micro-blogging platform admitted in September.

The bug ran from May 2017 and after discovering it, Twitter said it fixed the bug to prevent data from being unintentionally sent to the incorrect developer.

Twitter is also facing an investigation by privacy regulators in Ireland over data collection in its link-shortening system. (IANS)

Next Story

Pessimistic Millennials Across the World Storm Twitter with Retirement Plans

A recent report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) found that today, just 60 per cent of millennials are considered middle-class, compared to 70 per cent of baby boomers when they were in their twenties

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Twitter, India, Smartphone
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

Millennials across the world stormed Twitter with suggestions how they would like to retire, using the hashtag #millennialretirementplans, and most of them had pessimistic and gloomy views about their golden years.

From living in their parents’ basements to colonizing the Mars only to destroy it like Earth, millennials (those born between 1980 and 2000) wished for early death via dark-themed jokes and memes about never been able to retire and putting the blame on Baby Boomers (those born worldwide between 1946 and 1964) and political upheavals.

“Hope we don’t die in our chairs during a meeting that could have been an email,” wrote one user.

“Watch as the environment disintegrates and move to Mars, where we will yet again, destroy another planet,” posted another.

Most of the millennials painted a bleak picture of their retirement plans.

“Why is this even on trending? We all know we’ll never be able to retire,” said another Twitter user.

“Cultivate my kids so they can become successful millionaires and live off of them,” wrote one.

There were several tweets about poor healthcare as a barrier to a good retirement.

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FILE – A man reads tweets on his phone in front of a displayed Twitter logo. VOA

“Work myself to death since healthcare is a debt sentence & social security won’t exist by the time I’m of ‘retiring age’. Or just wait for the nuclear apocalypse,” said one millennial user.

“Early death,” said one.

“Dumpsters are the new tiny houses,” posted another.

A few millennial users, however, made light of the situation.

Also Read: Tech Giant Apple Invests Additional $250mn in Corning for iPhone Glasses

“Travelling around the world collecting Pokemon Go,” said a user.

Other comments were: “Have older people pay for you now, have younger people pay for you later,” and “become an anti-social media influencer”.

A recent report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) found that today, just 60 per cent of millennials are considered middle-class, compared to 70 per cent of baby boomers when they were in their twenties. (IANS)