Monday February 19, 2018

Are bullied kids prone to suicidal behaviour?

Children who experienced severe peer victimisation were more than twice as likely to report depression or low moods at age 15, and three times more likely to report anxiety

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Victimization in early school days leads to anxiety. Pixabay
Victimization in early school days leads to anxiety. Pixabay
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  • Children face most severe levels of victimization from the beginning of their schooling.
  • These kids develop significant symptoms of suicidal behaviour and anxiety.
  • Even after the victimization ends, it affects still pertains.

A study found that children who face bullying can be at a risk of developing mental health issues, suicidal thoughts and anxiety in their years. For the study, the team looked at 1,363 children who were followed until the age of 15 years.

About 59 percent of participants had experienced some peer victimisation in the first years of elementary school, although it generally declined as the children grew older.

“Our findings showed a general tendency, in about 15 percent of the children, of being exposed to the most severe levels of victimisation from the beginning of their education until the transition to high school,” said Marie-Claude Geoffroy, from the McGill University in Canada.

Also Read: Anxiety and depression genetic, says research

Even though victimization can end after school days, its affect still pertains. Pixabay
Even though victimization can end after school days, its affect still pertains. Pixabay

Findings

  • Children who experienced severe peer victimisation were more than twice as likely to report depression or low moods at age 15, and three times more likely to report anxiety.
  • This group of children were also 3.5 times more likely to report serious suicidal thoughts or attempt suicide.

“Those children were at greater risk of debilitating depressive/dysthymic symptoms or anxiety and of suicidality in adolescence than less severely victimised children, even after we accounted for a plethora of confounders assessed throughout childhood,” Geoffroy added.

Also read: List of 8 Food Items to Battle Depression and Anxiety

“Although peer victimisation starts to decrease by the end of childhood, individuals in the severe trajectory group were still being exposed to the highest level of victimisation in early adolescence,” Geoffroy noted.

Severe peer victimisation may contribute to the development of mental health problems in adolescence, thus, it is important to prevent victimisation early in the lifespan, the results suggest.

The study was published in journal CMAJ. (IANS)

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Why do people quit their job?

The trend of quitting a job is taking a heavy toll on the young generation. The reason can vary from work-related, personal, family to some miscellaneous reasons.

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Quitting job is related to multiple factors. Wikimedia Commons
Quitting job is related to multiple factors. Wikimedia Commons

Every now and then we come across someone who quit his job or is thinking to quit. I talked to some of these people and figured out that there are multiple contributing factors for this. Basically, these can be grouped as work-related, personal, family related, or miscellaneous reasons. These can play a role either alone or in combination.

Work-related Reasons:

1. Uncaring boss or bullying by boss or seniors leading to stress and negative thoughts.

2. Feeling of micromanagement and continuous supervision

3. No promotions or financial increments.

4. Odd or long hours of work or different shifts leading to mental and physical exhaustion and disturbance of sleep cycle.

5. Corruption, favouritism, biases at the workplace.

6. No recognition or reward for hard and honest work.

7. Frequent hiring and firing at the workplace. Feeling of insecurity.

8. No challenges in the workplace. Underutilization of skills.

9. Low pay, wages, or bonus.

10. False promises by the employer.

11. Working in isolated chambers, strained relationship with co-workers or if the work environment is not optimal.

Also Read: Ten Tips On How To Boost Self-Confidence

12. Cultural isolation at the workplace. Feeling left out.

13. Forced to quit by the employer.

Striking balance between job and life is very important. Wikimedia Commons
Striking balance between job and life is very important. Wikimedia Commons

Personal Reasons:

1.Not able to keep up with latest technologies and advancements.

2. Health issues. Not able to keep appointments and take care of own health.

3.Long commute to work.

4. Not able to do housework.

5. No time for personal care, spiritual advancement, socialization, keeping up with hobbies.

6. Inability to attend social events, arrange vacations, or calling in sick.

7. Urge to work from home.

8. Personality factor. Not able to work with someone. Want to be the boss and desire to control. Want to quit because of arrogance or in a fit of rage.

9. Depression.

10. Inadequate skills to continue working and feeling that performance is not optimal and can lead to harm.

Also Read: How to Manage Your Time Smartly and Effectively?

Family Reasons:

1. Inability to take proper care of family members or spend time with them.

2. Sick family member.

3. Family in a different city, state, or country.

4. Pressure to quit from family, relatives, or friends

Most of the youngsters are becoming a victim of depression due to various factors. Wikimedia Commons
Most of the youngsters are becoming a victim of depression due to various factors. Wikimedia Commons

Miscellaneous Reasons:

1.Financial security is in place. The job is just a way to pass time.

2.Want to give an opportunity to younger people.

3.Greener Pasteur (opportunity to find a better life)

4. Afraid of lawsuits or legal actions.

5.The belief that they will get more money and work fewer hours in the new endeavour.

6. Anticipating getting fired.

7. Lured by other employers.

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