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Bullying at Workplace: Women take Leaves while Men often choose to Leave the Workplace altogether

Bullying also hampers their opportunities for pay increases and promotions

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London, December 19, 2016: Bullying affects men and women differently. Whereas it often causes women to go on prolonged sick leave or use antidepressants, men often choose to leave the labour market altogether for a period of time, a new research has found.

The researchers said it was a surprise to learn that bullying does not seem to increase men’s sickness absence.

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“In fact, it seems that men who are bullied are more likely than women to go to work even though they are actually sick,” said Tine Mundbjerg Eriksen, Assistant Professor at School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University in Denmark.

“At the same time, it appears that bullying affects men’s salary level negatively, which indicates that the bullying hampers their opportunities for pay increases and promotions,” she said.

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One way of bullying is that your colleagues or your boss impede your ability to do your job properly, make changes to your work or hand the fun and important tasks to others, she explained.

In the study involving over 3,000 people in both public and private organisations, seven per cent of the respondents reported that they were being subjected to bullying. Of these, 43 per cent were men.

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When it comes to the type and frequency of bullying, the research, published in the journal of Labour Economics, showed that men are just as exposed to work or personal-related bullying as women, but are actually slightly more exposed to physical intimidation than women.

“The million-dollar question is why men primarily react by leaving the workplace, while women react to bullying by taking prolonged sick leaves. If anything, this illustrates that men and women handle bullying differently,” Eriksen said. (IANS)

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Bullying Bosses Bad for Workplace Safety, Reveals Study

"Bosses' behaviour can strengthen or weaken employees' sense of belonging to the work group by supporting

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Bullying, Bosses, Workplace
According to the study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, the researchers surveyed 589 airline pilots and 468 manufacturing technicians and found that employees' safety behaviour can get worse when they are treated in ways that detract from their bonds. Pixabay

Bullying bosses are not just bad for the morale and well-being of employees — they can also be bad for workplace safety, reveals a study.

According to the study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology, the researchers surveyed 589 airline pilots and 468 manufacturing technicians and found that employees’ safety behaviour can get worse when they are treated in ways that detract from their bonds to a work group.

“Bosses’ behaviour can strengthen or weaken employees’ sense of belonging to the work group by supporting or undermining their status within the group. Poor treatment from a boss can make employees feel that they are not valued by the group,” said Liu-Qin Yang, Associate Professor at Portland State University.

This makes them more self-centered, leading them to occasionally forget to comply with safety rules or overlook opportunities to promote a safer work environment.

Bullying, Bosses, Workplace
Bullying bosses are not just bad for the morale and well-being of employees — they can also be bad for workplace safety, reveals a study. Pixabay

According to the researchers, this was especially true among employees who were more uncertain about their social standing within the group.

“When people are less sure about their strengths, weaknesses and their status within the group, they become more sensitive. They are more likely to respond negatively to their boss’ bullying behaviours,” she said.

Workplace safety is a critical issue — and more so in an environment where one employee’s failure to behave safely can create circumstances where other people are likely to be injured, said the researchers.

The study recommends implementing training programmes that can improve leadership skills while interacting with their employees so as to provide feedback in a way that are neither offensive nor threatening.

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The study also suggested promoting a more civil and engaged work environment that strengthens social bonds between employees and creates a buffer against the negative consequences of their boss’ bad behaviours.

According to researchers, implementing transparent performance evaluation processes are required so that employees have less uncertainty about their social status in the workplace. (IANS)