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Bullying at Workplace: Women take Leaves while Men often choose to Leave the Workplace altogether

Bullying also hampers their opportunities for pay increases and promotions

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Representational image. Pixabay

London, December 19, 2016: Bullying affects men and women differently. Whereas it often causes women to go on prolonged sick leave or use antidepressants, men often choose to leave the labour market altogether for a period of time, a new research has found.

The researchers said it was a surprise to learn that bullying does not seem to increase men’s sickness absence.

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“In fact, it seems that men who are bullied are more likely than women to go to work even though they are actually sick,” said Tine Mundbjerg Eriksen, Assistant Professor at School of Business and Social Sciences, Aarhus University in Denmark.

“At the same time, it appears that bullying affects men’s salary level negatively, which indicates that the bullying hampers their opportunities for pay increases and promotions,” she said.

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One way of bullying is that your colleagues or your boss impede your ability to do your job properly, make changes to your work or hand the fun and important tasks to others, she explained.

In the study involving over 3,000 people in both public and private organisations, seven per cent of the respondents reported that they were being subjected to bullying. Of these, 43 per cent were men.

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When it comes to the type and frequency of bullying, the research, published in the journal of Labour Economics, showed that men are just as exposed to work or personal-related bullying as women, but are actually slightly more exposed to physical intimidation than women.

“The million-dollar question is why men primarily react by leaving the workplace, while women react to bullying by taking prolonged sick leaves. If anything, this illustrates that men and women handle bullying differently,” Eriksen said. (IANS)

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Teasing and Bullying Kids About Their Weight May Make Them Gain Even More

Youth experiencing high levels of teasing gained an average of .20 kg per year more than those who did not

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Teasing, Bullying, Kids, Weight Gain
The stress of being teased could stimulate the release of the hormone cortisol. Pixabay

Teasing and bullying overweight children could act as a catalyst in further increasing their weight by 33 per cent, compared to obese kids who do not suffer body shaming, a study suggests.

The findings, published in the journal Pediatric Obesity, appear to contradict the belief that such teasing might motivate youth to change their behaviour and attempt to lose weight.

The study involved over 100 youths who were an average of 11.8 years of age when they enrolled, according to Natasha A. Schvey, Assistant Professor at the Uniformed Services University in the US.

The participants were either overweight (defined as a body mass index above the 85th percentile) when they began the study or had two parents who were overweight or obese.

Teasing, Bullying, Kids, Weight Gain
Teasing and bullying overweight children could act as a catalyst in further increasing their weight. Pixabay

For the study, they completed a six-item questionnaire on whether they had been teased about their weight. They then participated in annual follow-up visits for the next 15 years.

The researchers found that youth experiencing high levels of teasing gained an average of .20 kg per year more than those who did not.

The research team theorises that weight-associated stigma may have made youths more likely to engage in unhealthy behaviours, such as binge eating and avoiding exercise.

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Another possible explanation is that the stress of being teased could stimulate the release of the hormone cortisol, which may lead to weight gain, said the researchers. (IANS)