Thursday December 12, 2019

Teasing and Bullying Kids About Their Weight May Make Them Gain Even More

Youth experiencing high levels of teasing gained an average of .20 kg per year more than those who did not

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Teasing, Bullying, Kids, Weight Gain
The stress of being teased could stimulate the release of the hormone cortisol. Pixabay

Teasing and bullying overweight children could act as a catalyst in further increasing their weight by 33 per cent, compared to obese kids who do not suffer body shaming, a study suggests.

The findings, published in the journal Pediatric Obesity, appear to contradict the belief that such teasing might motivate youth to change their behaviour and attempt to lose weight.

The study involved over 100 youths who were an average of 11.8 years of age when they enrolled, according to Natasha A. Schvey, Assistant Professor at the Uniformed Services University in the US.

The participants were either overweight (defined as a body mass index above the 85th percentile) when they began the study or had two parents who were overweight or obese.

Teasing, Bullying, Kids, Weight Gain
Teasing and bullying overweight children could act as a catalyst in further increasing their weight. Pixabay

For the study, they completed a six-item questionnaire on whether they had been teased about their weight. They then participated in annual follow-up visits for the next 15 years.

The researchers found that youth experiencing high levels of teasing gained an average of .20 kg per year more than those who did not.

The research team theorises that weight-associated stigma may have made youths more likely to engage in unhealthy behaviours, such as binge eating and avoiding exercise.

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Another possible explanation is that the stress of being teased could stimulate the release of the hormone cortisol, which may lead to weight gain, said the researchers. (IANS)

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Gaining Weight in Mid-20’s Associated with Early Death

An analysis included 36,051 people aged 40 years or over with measured body weight and height at the start of the survey (baseline) and recalled weight at young adulthood (25 years old) and middle adulthood (average age 47 years)

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After taking account of potentially influential factors, the researchers found that people who Have Increased Weight throughout adult life had the highest risk of Death, while people who remained overweight throughout adult life had a very modest or no association with mortality. Pixabay

Gaining weight from your mid-20s into middle age is associated with an increased risk of premature Death, warn researchers.

According to the study published in the BMJ journal, weight loss at older ages (from middle to late adulthood) was also linked to higher risk.

“The results highlight the importance of maintaining normal weight across adulthood, especially preventing weight gain in early adulthood, for preventing premature deaths in later life,” said study researchers from China.

For the study, researchers based in China set out to investigate the association between weight changes across adulthood and mortality.

Their findings were based on data from the 1988-94 and 1999-2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), a nationally representative annual survey that includes interviews, physical examinations and blood samples, to gauge the health of the US citizens.

Their analysis included 36,051 people aged 40 years or over with measured body weight and height at the start of the survey (baseline) and recalled weight at young adulthood (25 years old) and middle adulthood (average age 47 years).

Deaths from any cause and specifically from heart diseases were recorded for an average of 12 years, during which time there were 10,500 deaths.

After taking account of potentially influential factors, the researchers found that people who remained obese throughout adult life had the highest risk of mortality, while people who remained overweight throughout adult life had a very modest or no association with mortality.

Death
Gaining Weight from your mid-20s into middle age is associated with an increased risk of premature Death, warn researchers. Pixabay

Weight gain from young to middle adulthood was associated with increased risk of mortality, compared with participants who remained at normal weight.

Weight loss over this period was not significantly related to mortality.

ALSO READ: Low Birth Weight Can Lead to Cardiovascular Diseases

But as people got older, the association between weight gain and mortality weakened, whereas the association with weight loss from middle to late adulthood became stronger and significant. (IANS)