Wednesday August 22, 2018

Weymouth Ceremony in UK: Buxton Anti-Slavery Monument Unveiled

Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton was an MP in Weymouth and a strong advocate for anti-slavery.

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Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton. Wikimedia.
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  • In a dedication ceremony held on Monday 5th June 2017, the Thomas Fowell Buxton Society unveiled a monument in memory of the former Weymouth MP
  • Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton was an anti-slavery campaigner in the 19th century and a great philanthropist
  • The entire funding of the monument is paid for in the form of donations and fundraising

Who was Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton? 

Sir Buxton was a former Member of Parliament for Weymouth, United Kingdom (Position he held from 1818-1837). He was famous for his anti-slavery campaigns and his successful contributions in the abolishment of slavery throughout the British Empire by 1833 (with the exception of India). The people of Weymouth loved him and have “grown up with his legacy”.

He was the founding member of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals which later became Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA). Late Sir Buxton was “a man of great integrity,” said Dr. John Fannon, the Society Founding Member. He was also a “great philanthropist”. 

About the Monument:

Family, friends and the society of Weymouth gathered to celebrate the unveiling ceremony of the monument in Weymouth’s Bincleaves Green. This is not the first monument in memory of Sir Buxton. His memorials can be seen in London, Jamaica, and Sierra Leone too. According to BBC, the monument costs £90,000. It was funded in the form of donations and fundraising events.

The Monument at Bincleaves Green, Weymouth. Image courtesy: The Thomas Fowell Buxton Society (from their website).

Peter Loizou, a former Weymouth College student, is the man behind the design of the monument. The stone for the monument comes from Albion Stone, Portland.

A total of 144 stones were used to build the monument. The stones were carved by the student of Weymouth College under the supervision and expertise of Master Craftsman Richard Mortimer.

The monument had been under construction since the year 2010 and was completed by November 2016.

To know more about Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, click here. We would like to thank Dr. John Fannon, Founding Member of The Thomas Fowell Buxton Society for his support to this article.

by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter@Saksham2394

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Archaeological Sites Dating Back Thousands of Years Found Around Britain, Thanks to the Heat

The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them.

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A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London
A view shows parched grass from the lack of rain in Greenwich Park, backdropped by the Royal Museums Greenwich and the skyscrapers of the Canary Wharf business district, during what has been the driest summer for many years in London. VOA

Britain’s hottest summer in decades has revealed cropmarks across the country showing the archaeological sites of Iron Age settlements, Roman farms and even Neolithic monuments dating back thousands of years, archaeologists said Wednesday.

Cropmarks — patterns of shading in crops and grass seen most clearly from the air — form faster in hot weather as the fields dry out, making this summer’s heat wave ideal for discovering such sites.

Archaeologists at the public body Historic England have been making the most of the hot weather to look for patterns revealing the ancient sites buried below, from Yorkshire in the north down to Cornwall in the southwest.

Archeology , Neolithic artefacts. england
Neolithic remains (representational image). Wikimedia

“We’ve discovered hundreds of new sites this year spanning about 6,000 years of England’s history,” said Damian Grady, aerial reconnaissance manager at Historic England.

“Each new site is interesting in itself, but the fact we’re finding so many sites over such a large area is filling in a lot of gaps in knowledge about how people lived and farmed and managed the landscape in the past,” he said.

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The archaeologists are mapping the sites to determine the significance of the remains beneath and how best to protect them. While some may be significant enough to merit national protection from development, local authorities or farmers may be left to decide what to do at other sites.

“We’ll hopefully get the help of farmers to help protect some of these undesignated sites,” Grady said. (VOA)