Sunday October 21, 2018

Weymouth Ceremony in UK: Buxton Anti-Slavery Monument Unveiled

Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton was an MP in Weymouth and a strong advocate for anti-slavery.

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Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton. Wikimedia.
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  • In a dedication ceremony held on Monday 5th June 2017, the Thomas Fowell Buxton Society unveiled a monument in memory of the former Weymouth MP
  • Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton was an anti-slavery campaigner in the 19th century and a great philanthropist
  • The entire funding of the monument is paid for in the form of donations and fundraising

Who was Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton? 

Sir Buxton was a former Member of Parliament for Weymouth, United Kingdom (Position he held from 1818-1837). He was famous for his anti-slavery campaigns and his successful contributions in the abolishment of slavery throughout the British Empire by 1833 (with the exception of India). The people of Weymouth loved him and have “grown up with his legacy”.

He was the founding member of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals which later became Royal Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA). Late Sir Buxton was “a man of great integrity,” said Dr. John Fannon, the Society Founding Member. He was also a “great philanthropist”. 

About the Monument:

Family, friends and the society of Weymouth gathered to celebrate the unveiling ceremony of the monument in Weymouth’s Bincleaves Green. This is not the first monument in memory of Sir Buxton. His memorials can be seen in London, Jamaica, and Sierra Leone too. According to BBC, the monument costs £90,000. It was funded in the form of donations and fundraising events.

The Monument at Bincleaves Green, Weymouth. Image courtesy: The Thomas Fowell Buxton Society (from their website).

Peter Loizou, a former Weymouth College student, is the man behind the design of the monument. The stone for the monument comes from Albion Stone, Portland.

A total of 144 stones were used to build the monument. The stones were carved by the student of Weymouth College under the supervision and expertise of Master Craftsman Richard Mortimer.

The monument had been under construction since the year 2010 and was completed by November 2016.

To know more about Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, click here. We would like to thank Dr. John Fannon, Founding Member of The Thomas Fowell Buxton Society for his support to this article.

by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter@Saksham2394

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Copyright 2017 NewsGram

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A Significant Find By Archaeologists Hint At Piranha Like Fish In Jurassic Era

The new fish is a most interesting example of convergent evolution

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Fossil Fish
A new piranha-like fish from Jurassic seas with sharp, pointed teeth that probably fed on the fins of other fishes is seen in this artist's reconstruction of a fossil which was discovered in southern Germany in this image released from Eichstaett, Bavaria, Germany. VOA

You can call it a prehistoric prequel.

Scientists said on Thursday they have unearthed in southern Germany the fossil of a fish that, with its mouth full of razor-sharp teeth, strongly resembled today’s piranhas, the stars of more than their fair share of Hollywood horror films. But this one lived during the Jurassic Period 152 million years ago.

Named Piranhamesodon pinnatomus, it is the earliest known example of a bony fish — as opposed to cartilaginous fish like sharks — able to slice flesh rather than simply swallowing prey, enabling it to attack victims larger than itself as piranhas can.

Piranhamesodon, about 3-1/2 inches (9 cm) long, lived in the sponge and coral reefs of the Solnhofen archipelago, a shallow tropical sea in what is now Bavaria. Piranhas are freshwater fish that inhabit rivers and lakes in South America.

Fossil Fish
A new piranha-like fish fossil from Jurassic seas with sharp, pointed teeth that probably fed on the fins of other fishes, discovered in southern Germany from the time of dinosaurs and from the same deposits that contained Archaeopteryx, is seen in this image released from Eichstaett, Bavaria, Germany on October 18, 2018

Piranhamesodon was small, but its mouth was worthy of a scary movie. It boasted long, pointed, dagger-like teeth along the outer edge of its upper jaw and at the front of its lower jaw. It also had triangular teeth with serrated cutting edges on the side of its lower jaw.

“We were stunned that this fish had teeth which are capable of slicing flesh. It comes from a group of fishes, the pycnodontids, that are famous for their crushing teeth,” said paleontologist Martina Kölbl-Ebert of the Jura-Museum Eichstätt in Germany, who led the research published in the journal Current Biology.

“It is like finding a sheep with a snarl like a wolf,” Kölbl-Ebert added.

The fossil came from the same Bavarian limestone deposits as Archaeopteryx, the earliest-known bird.

“From the same quarry, we also have a number of other fish which may have been the victims of Piranhamesodon. They show injuries to their fins and fin bases, some freshly wounded before they died and got fossilized, whereas others show completely healed injuries with regeneration of the fin,” Kölbl-Ebert said.

Fossil Fish
With Piranha-Like Teeth, This Prehistoric Predator Never Bit Off More Than It Could Chew.

While it shares traits with piranhas, Piranhamesodon was neither their long-ago ancestor nor related to them at all. The oldest-known piranhas lived around 15 million years ago.

Piranhamesodon is an example of a phenomenon called convergent evolution in which organisms independently acquire similar characteristics as a result of adapting to similar ecological niches or environments.

Also Read: Fossils of 400 Year Old Invertebrate Marine Species Found in China

“The new fish is a most interesting example of convergent evolution, evolving — for bony fish then — a completely new way of life,” Kölbl-Ebert said. (VOA)