Tuesday July 23, 2019

By 2030, Over 98 mn Indians Will Have Diabetes, Lancet Study Revealed

Insulin is essential for all people with Type-1 diabetes and some people with Type-2 diabetes to reduce the risk of complications such as blindness, amputation, kidney failure, and stroke

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Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

While Type-2 diabetes is expected to rise by more than a fifth, from 406 million in 2018 to 511 million in 2030 globally, India along with China and the US will share over half of these high blood sugar cases, say researchers led by one of an Indian-origin, while asserting the need to improve access for the life saving insulin.

The study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, showed that China (130 million) followed by India (98 million), and the US (32 million) will constitute over half of Type-2 diabetics by 2030.

As a result, the amount of insulin needed to effectively treat Type-2 diabetes will rise by more than 20 per cent worldwide over the next 12 years.

Compared to current levels of insulin access, if universal global access was achieved (with a treatment target of HbA1c — measure of blood glucose) seven per cent or lower, the number of people with Type-2 diabetes worldwide using insulin in 2030 would double from around 38 million (7.4 per cent of all people with Type-2 diabetes) to 79 million (15.5 per cent), the researchers said.

“Despite the UN’s commitment to treat non-communicable diseases and ensure universal access to drugs for diabetes, across much of the world insulin is scarce and unnecessarily difficult for patients to access,” said lead author Sanjay Basu from Stanford University, US.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

“The number of adults with Type-2 diabetes is expected to rise over the next 12 years due to ageing, urbanisation, and associated changes in diet and physical activity.

“Unless governments begin initiatives to make insulin available and affordable, then its use is always going to be far from optimal,” Basu said.

For the study, the team used data from the International Diabetes Federation and 14 cohort studies and estimated the burden of Type-2 diabetes in 221 countries and territories between 2018 and 2030.

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Insulin is essential for all people with Type-1 diabetes and some people with Type-2 diabetes to reduce the risk of complications such as blindness, amputation, kidney failure, and stroke.

As global rates of Type-2 diabetes soar and people live longer (which will increase insulin requirements), a comprehensive picture of global insulin need is required because insulin treatment is costly and the international insulin market is presently dominated by only three major manufacturers, the researchers noted. (IANS)

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Women with Diabetes at Higher Risk of Heart Failure than Men

The number one leading cause of death for women is heart disease

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diabetes
The IDF expects by the year 2040 around 313 million women will be suffering from the disease. Pixabay

While doctors know that diabetes raises the risk of heart failure, a global study of 12 million people has found that this risk is greater for women than men. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), currently 415 million adults world-wide live with diabetes – with approximately 199 million of them being women.

In India, which is often called the diabetes capital of the world, there were over 72 million cases of diabetes in 2017 – which means about 8.8 per cent of the country’s adult population had the disease.

While Type-1 diabetes is associated with a 47 per cent excess risk of heart failure in women compared to men, Type-2 diabetes has a nine per cent higher excess risk of heart failure for women than men, said the study published in the journal Diabetologia.

diabetes
Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women and claims 2.1 million female lives every year, more so than men. Pixabay

There are a number of reasons why women with diabetes are at greater risk of heart complications, said study co-author Sanne Peters of The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford.

“Women were reported to have two years’ longer duration of prediabetes than men and this increased duration may be associated with greater excess risk of heart failure in women” said Peters.

“Some major concerns are that women are also being undertreated for diabetes, are not taking the same levels of medications as men and are less likely to receive intensive care,” Peters said.

diabetes
The risk of diabetes is also connected to dental health via glucose tolerance. Pixabay

The IDF reports that girls and women with diabetes experience a range of challenges. Gender roles, power imbalances, socioeconomic inequalities resulting in poor diet and lack of physical activity can all influence vulnerability to diabetes.

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Women’s limited access to health services and lack of pro-activity when it comes to seeking treatment for health problems can also amplify the impact of diabetes, particularly in developing countries.

The IDF expects by the year 2040 around 313 million women will be suffering from the disease. Diabetes is the ninth leading cause of death in women and claims 2.1 million female lives every year, more so than men. The number one leading cause of death for women is heart disease. (IANS)