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Cabinet Approves Plan to Set-Up 20 AIIMS

The construction of new AIIMS will be fully funded by the Central government. It will also bear the operations and maintenance expenses of these facilities.

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AIIMS Rishikesh, wikimedia commons

The Union Cabinet chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Wednesday approved a plan to set up 20 All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) across the country, six of which have already been established, and to upgrade 73 medical colleges.

The decisions are part of the Pradhan Mantri Swasthya Suraksha Yojana (PMSSY), which has been extended by two years till 2020, with a financial outlay of Rs 14,832 crore, Union Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad told reporters while briefing on the cabinet decisions.

“Under this (PMSSY), we are going to set up 20 AIIMS in the country, six have already been established, and would upgrade 73 medical colleges. This is a historic decision,” said the Union Law and Information Technology Minister.

The construction of new AIIMS will be fully funded by the Central government. It will also bear the operations and maintenance expenses of these facilities.
Narendra Modi, wikimedia commons

The decision to extend the PMSSY was aimed to meet the shortfall in healthcare professionals and facilities across the country.

“Setting up of new AIIMS would not only transform health education and training but also address the shortfall of healthcare professionals in the region… Setting up of new AIIMS in various states will lead to employment generation for nearly 3,000 people in various faculty and non-faculty posts in each of the AIIMS,” said an official statement.

The construction of new AIIMS will be fully funded by the Central government. It will also bear the operations and maintenance expenses of these facilities.

The upgradation programme broadly envisages improving health infrastructure through construction of super specialty blocks, trauma centres and others, according to the statement.

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The procurement of medical equipment for existing as well as new facilities will be done on sharing basis by both Central and state governments.

“PMSSY was started during the government of Atal Bihari Vajpayee to provide quality healthcare in remote areas as it’s not right to put all the pressure on AIIMS in Delhi. There were talks of setting up six AIIMS. But what happened in the next 10 years is for all to see,” said Prasad. (IANS)

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Remarkable Insight into How Governance in India Ought to be Upgraded

It is presumed that the Director LBSNAA, who was part of the planning of this important event, would have the full address of the PM placed

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Governance, India, Prime Minister
The profound message coming from him was that the officers of the All India Services were meant to work with a 'national mindset' regardless of what posts they held and that they must rise. Wikimedia Commons

With a remarkable insight into how the governance in this country ought to be upgraded, Prime Minister Modi while addressing the Probationers of Indian Civil Services attending the Foundational Course, outlined the big picture of ‘the mission and delivery’ that the officers manning the famed ‘steel frame’ of India were expected to measure up to in their long years of duty ahead. In a first time event, the officers who were in the early phase of their training were assembled at a place outside of the LBSNAA Mussoorie — at Kevadia in Gujarat, the venue of Sardar Patel’s statue — for the Prime Minister’s address on October 31 marking the National Unity Day.

The Prime Minister, in fact, spent the better part of the day with them. The profound message coming from him was that the officers of the All India Services were meant to work with a ‘national mindset’ regardless of what posts they held and that they must rise above domestic divisions of caste, creed and region to always decide on what would be in the larger interest of the nation and the common man. It is presumed that the Director LBSNAA, who was part of the planning of this important event, would have the full address of the PM placed in the libraries of the Mussoorie Academy as well as the premier training institutes of all national civil services.

The three most important points of strategic guidance that Prime Minister Narendra Modi presented to the young officers were that they should consider themselves primarily as service providers, that they should work for the higher objective of promoting ‘ease of living’ keeping the poorest in view and that they must not get into the habit of shunning decision making and yielding to the status quo. He reminded them that the bigger opportunities ‘that the nation was providing them’ also exposed them to higher responsibilities and told them upfront that negative perceptions about bureaucracy had to be ended. Perhaps the most incisive comment the Prime Minister made was that governance should neither have a ‘suppressive impact’ nor should it be ineffective to the point of creating the illusion that there was ‘no government’ in place. This last is the crux of what needs to happen in India by way of a demonstrable reform in governance.

Bureaucracy likes to work on the borrowed strength of its political masters and not on the foundation of sound judgement dictated by its own in-depth experience of years of public service. There is no other country that provides the equivalent of IAS and IPS in terms of the high starting point of a career in civil service that a meritorious young person gets — making one the Collector, a virtual ‘king’ of a big territory called the District and the other the SSP, a Commander in Chief of thousands of armed men in uniform and personnel of the civil police there — all in the course of just 5-6 years of service.

Governance, India, Prime Minister
The Prime Minister, in fact, spent the better part of the day with them. Wikimedia Commons

It is ironic that in their journey up the promotion ladder, they become reclusive and desk bound and tend to lose out on their role as a mentor for their juniors. Prime Minister Modi did not forget to remind the probationers that their outreach to the people must not diminish and convey it to the seniors in the administration and the police that the old tradition of an outgoing officer leaving behind instructive ‘notes’ for his successor deserved to be restored. It is difficult to find another example of the chief of the political executive governing a big democracy like India’s, himself giving such explicit apolitical advice to the bureaucracy on how to improve upon its working.

In a subtle mentoring of the young officers done by the Prime Minister himself, he enthused them to believe that they were uniquely placed to improve the ‘ecosystem of governance’ for the nation’s ‘capacity building’. He suggested that in the first years of their posting amongst the people in a district, they should work for ‘one district, one problem, total solution’. This is an extremely thoughtful way of getting the most productive results out of the initial years of the civil services officers when they were still fired with passion for work and relatively unspoilt by extraneous influences.

In fact, there is a case for India ‘going back to the districts’ for governance as the collector and SSP between themselves can monitor both development and security in their district segment. This tradition has broken down because their seniors — chief secretary and DGP — do not back them for reasons that are known. The centre must find a way of having a say in the appointment of these two top officials — the Supreme Court has already facilitated this process in respect of the DGP which should be replicated for the appointment of the chief secretary as well. The crucial point is about UPSC drawing up a panel in consultation with the state government for the purpose — an idea supported by the apex court implicitly on the ground that the centre had a responsibility for tracking the performance of IAS and IPS officers whom it recruits and trains before it allocates them to the states.

Prime Minister Modi’s address at Kevadia touched on a basic principle of governance — it should provide stability without becoming suppressive. In the name of sending out a message that India had a ‘strong’ government, the bureaucracy including the enforcement agencies are beginning to exercise their power in a manner that impacted adversely the average law abiding citizen — not primarily the big offenders. The two major coercive instruments of a democratic state — police and tax collectors — need to be on a responsible course to avoid creating the impression that they were out to ‘rule’ the people and not serve them.

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In Delhi, the traffic police is busy sending over speeding notices without specifying the excess speed recorded in each case while no effort is made to detect ‘lane surfing’ — a dangerous form of driving — that would require hard work on the part of the policemen. On the tax front, a long retired senior official, an octogenarian, who had received appreciation letters for tax payments was hauled up for some omission in the IT return that he had filed 11 years ago. The old man had to endure a long correspondence to establish that it is the computerised IT system that had failed to record certain entries.

Apparently an army of junior functionaries deployed for making a ‘total scan’ is exercising no discretion about concentrating on high income businessmen and professionals rather than on government servants. In the Modi regime, the responsibility of supervising senior officers has to be pushed up in the interest of governance. Just as Home Minister Amit Shah is directly overseeing the functioning of the internal security machinery, other ministers must take charge of the performance of their bureaucrats in terms of their public service orientation and pro-people decision making. (IANS)