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California Becomes the first US State to allow Gender-neutral Birth Certificates

The so-called "nonbinary" gender means not exclusively male or female or a combination of two or more "genders."

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The law, published on the government official website, also made it easier for people to change their gender identity on official documents. Pixabay
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California, October 17, 2017 : California Governor Jerry Brown has signed a state senate bill, allowing a gender-neutral marker on birth certificates and driver’s licenses starting from 2019.

California thus became the first state in the US to allow a “nonbinary” gender to be marked on birth certificates, Xinhua news agency reported.

The so-called “nonbinary” gender means not exclusively male or female or a combination of two or more “genders.”

According to the Gender Recognition Act approved on Sunday, California will offer a gender-neutral option on state documents for those who are transgender, intersex and others who are not identified as male or female.

ALSO READ Finding their place in the world; Oxford Dictionary to include honorific Mx for transgenders

The law, published on the government official website, also made it easier for people to change their gender identity on official documents.

“Existing law authorises a person who was born in this state and who has undergone clinically appropriate treatment for the purpose of gender transition to obtain a new birth certificate from the State Registrar,” the bill read.

The Golden State is now also the second state in the US to allow residents to be identified by a gender marker other than “F” or “M” on their driver’s license.

Oregon and the District of Columbia had earlier issued the gender-neutral option on their driver’s licenses.

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Artist Renuka Rajiv Takes on Society, Gender Through Personal Narrative

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the "need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages."

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Rajiv described the prints as a "cathartic series" made while living in Melbourne. Flickr Commons

Exhibiting the interplay between words and visuals, a solo show by artist Renuka Rajiv critically chronicles and comments on matters of sexuality, gender, physicality and notions of family and relationships via personal narratives.

“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition, showing different renditions of fabric and paper using drawings, paper mache, tie-dye and embroidery.

It is on at the Vahdera Art Gallery here till August 18.

It includes a large body of textile and embroidery works, sculptures, and twenty four monotypes selected from a larger series of three hundred prints.

The fabric works are mostly made with old garments of the artist’s family and friends.

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“The Future Is Not My Gender” is a multidisciplinary exhibition. Flickr Common

“This is a moment in a long-term exploration of expressing the aspects of my reality that are outside the material world,” the Bengaluru-based artist said about the exhibition.

Rajiv described the prints as a “cathartic series” made while living in Melbourne.

Some drawings also weave visuals with verbal interjections — sharp observations around gender and sexuality within the larger social context.

“With a strong inclination towards the spontaneously created “hand-made” works, the exhibition accommodates the imaginative, observational and autobiographical,” Vahdera Art Gallery said in a statement.

Rajiv, who narrates not verbally but visually, says the “need for the visual arises from a need to communicate, but this need to communicate remains outside the realm of verbal languages”.

Also Read: US Painted in New Colours By a Refugee Artist

Rajiv was the recipient of the Emerging Artist Award (EAA) 2016, awarded by the Foundation for Indian Contemporary Art (FICA) in collaboration with Pro Helvetia, the Swiss Arts Council.

The exhibition is a culmination of the award process including a three-month residency in Switzerland in 2017. (IANS)