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California Drought: Water crisis may force citizens to drink their own sewage

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

With the lingering Californian drought becoming worse, citizens of the western American state are facing the prospect of eating their own faeces. The impact of the drought has been so hard that Californians are now appealing for treating sewage into drinking water.

Although the idea might seem gross, many scientists believe it is a safe and a more efficient way of treating the moderately treated sewage that is currently being flushed into the Pacific Ocean.

“That water is discharged into the ocean and lost forever. Yet it’s probably the single largest source of water supply for California over the next quarter-century”, Tim Quinn, executive director of the Association of California Water Agencies, told the LA Times.

According to several experts, carrying out proper and thorough filtration to remove bacteria can reduce the threat that treated sewage poses to health and can even make it cleaner than bottled water.

Treated sewage is not used for drinking purposes due to major opposition from the public, although it is already employed for ‘non-potable’ purposes, such as irrigating golf courses.

However, rhe immensity of the drought might change the opinion of people regarding the usage of treated sewage.

Professor George Tchobanoglous, a water treatment expert from UC Davis in California, pointed to 20 wastewater plants currently discharging into the Colorado River that could be harnessed.

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Report Claims, As Many As 1 Billion Indians Live in Areas of Water Scarcity

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater -- 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater -- 12 per cent of the global total.

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Global groundwater depletion - where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally - increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India's rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period. Pixabay

As many as one billion people in India live in areas of physical water scarcity, of which 600 million are in areas of high to extreme water stress, according to a new report.

Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid.

This number is expected to go up to five billion by 2050, said the report titled “Beneath the Surface: The State of the World’s Water 2019”, released to mark World Water Day on March 22.

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Pure water droplet. Pixabay

Physical water scarcity is getting worse, exacerbated by growing demand on water resources and and by climate and population changes.

By 2040 it is predicted that 33 countries are likely to face extremely high water stress – including 15 in the Middle East, most of Northern Africa, Pakistan, Turkey, Afghanistan and Spain. Many – including India, China, Southern Africa, USA and Australia – will face high water stress.

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Globally, close to four billion people live in water-scarce areas, where, for at least part of the year, demand exceeds supply, said the report by non-profit organisation WaterAid. Pixabay

Global groundwater depletion – where the amount of water taken from aquifers exceeds the amount that is restored naturally – increased by 22 per cent between 2000 and 2010, said the report, adding that India’s rate of groundwater depletion increased by 23 per cent during the same period.

Also Read: Beware! Sipping Hot Tea Raises Risk of Esophageal Cancer

The report also highlighted that India uses the largest amount of groundwater — 24 per cent of the global total and the country is the third largest exporter of groundwater — 12 per cent of the global total.

The WaterAid report warned that food and clothing imported by wealthy Western countries are making it harder for many poor and marginalised communities to get a daily clean water supply as high-income countries buy products with considerable “water footprints” – the amount of water used in production — from water-scarce countries. (IANS)