Wednesday October 23, 2019
Home World California Dr...

California Drought: Water crisis may force citizens to drink their own sewage

0
//

640x-1

By NewsGram Staff Writer

With the lingering Californian drought becoming worse, citizens of the western American state are facing the prospect of eating their own faeces. The impact of the drought has been so hard that Californians are now appealing for treating sewage into drinking water.

Although the idea might seem gross, many scientists believe it is a safe and a more efficient way of treating the moderately treated sewage that is currently being flushed into the Pacific Ocean.

“That water is discharged into the ocean and lost forever. Yet it’s probably the single largest source of water supply for California over the next quarter-century”, Tim Quinn, executive director of the Association of California Water Agencies, told the LA Times.

According to several experts, carrying out proper and thorough filtration to remove bacteria can reduce the threat that treated sewage poses to health and can even make it cleaner than bottled water.

Treated sewage is not used for drinking purposes due to major opposition from the public, although it is already employed for ‘non-potable’ purposes, such as irrigating golf courses.

However, rhe immensity of the drought might change the opinion of people regarding the usage of treated sewage.

Professor George Tchobanoglous, a water treatment expert from UC Davis in California, pointed to 20 wastewater plants currently discharging into the Colorado River that could be harnessed.

Next Story

California to Require Public Universities to Offer Abortion Pills at Campus Health Centers

California's Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday signed the bill into law, which requires the states' 34 universities to offer abortion medication beginning]

0
California, Public, Universities
FILE - People rally in support of abortion rights at the Capitol in Sacramento, Calif., May 21, 2019. VOA

California has become the first state to require public universities to offer abortion pills at campus health centers.

California’s Governor Gavin Newsom on Friday signed the bill into law, which requires the states’ 34 universities to offer abortion medication beginning in 2023.

The medication is a first-trimester procedure that involves a woman taking two pills to create an effect similar to a miscarriage.

Newsom’s predecessor, Jerry Brown, who is also a Democrat, vetoed similar legislation last year, arguing that abortion services were “widely available off-campus” and so did not need to be provided by state universities.

California, Public, Universities
FILE – California Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., July 23, 2019. VOA

Democratic Senator Connie Leyva, who sponsored the bill, said in a statement Friday, “Abortion is a protected right, and it is important that everyone, including college students, have access to that right, if they so choose.”

Leyva has argued the bill would help young women who cannot get to outside abortion providers because of transportation or financial obstacles.

The bill has been opposed by religious and anti-abortion groups.

The University of California system has not taken a position on the matter but has raised concerns about the cost of the procedure as well as concerns over security issues related to providing abortions.

Also Read- Light Smoking also Damages Lungs, Says Study

The law does not require California universities to offer surgical abortions, which can be done past the first trimester.

Abortion medication can only be administered during the first trimester. It is different from the morning after pill, which is already available at many university health centers across the country. The morning after pill is taken after sex to block a pregnancy before it begins, while abortion medication ends a pregnancy after it has begun.

California’s decision to increase access to abortion comes at a time when many states are limiting the ability of women to receive abortions, leading to a flurry of legal challenges. Last week, the Supreme Court agreed to review a Louisiana law that opponents say would force most of the abortion clinics in the state to close. (VOA)