Friday March 22, 2019

Can Sleeping More Affect Your Heart?

While sleeping more raised triglycerides levels in both men and women, in women it led to higher waist circumference, blood sugar as well as lower levels of "good" cholesterol

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Can Sleeping More Affect Your Heart?
Can Sleeping More Affect Your Heart? Pixabay

If you thought that only less hours of sleep would affect your health, then you are wrong. Sleeping more than 10 hours per day is also associated with metabolic syndrome, raising the risk for heart diseases, according to a new study.

Those who slept for over 10 hours daily were at risk of elevated waist circumference, high triglyceride levels — a type of fat, low levels of “good” cholesterol, hypertension as well as high fasting blood sugar — referred to as metabolic syndrome and associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.

While sleeping more raised triglycerides levels in both men and women, in women it led to higher waist circumference, blood sugar as well as lower levels of “good” cholesterol.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Conversely, getting less than six hours of sleep was associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome in men and higher waist circumference among both men and women, researchers said.

“This is the largest study examining a dose-response association between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome and its components separately for men and women,” said lead author Claire E. Kim from Seoul National University College of Medicine in South Korea.

Also Read: Study: Sleeping For 7 Hours to Keep Your Heart Younger

The study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, included data from 1,33,608 participants aged between 40-69 years. The results showed that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was just over 29 per cent in men and 24.5 per cent in women.

“We observed a potential gender difference between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome, with an association between metabolic syndrome and long sleep in women and metabolic syndrome and short sleep in men,” said Kim. (IANS)

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Study Reveals Medicine Taken To Treat High Blood Pressure Can Lead An Increased Risk of Sudden Cardiac Arrest

The results, presented at the annual congress of European Heart Rhythm Association 2019 in Lisbon, showed that high-dose (60 mg/day) nifedipine was significantly associated with an increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with any dose of amlodipine. 

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"Nifedipine and amlodipine are often used by many cardiologists and other physicians, and the choice often depends on the prescriber's preference and personal experience," said Hanno Tan, cardiologist at the Academic Medical Center. VOA

A drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure and chest pain could be associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest, according to a study.

Doctors from the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, examined over 60,000 people to determine whether nifedipine and amlodipine or dihydropyridines — widely used for high blood pressure and angina — were linked with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

The results, presented at the annual congress of European Heart Rhythm Association 2019 in Lisbon, showed that high-dose (60 mg/day) nifedipine was significantly associated with an increased risk of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest with any dose of amlodipine.

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In sudden cardiac arrest, the heart stops pumping after a cardiac arrhythmia (ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia). This can be lethal if untreated. Pixabay

There was no risk associated with amlodipine.

“Nifedipine and amlodipine are often used by many cardiologists and other physicians, and the choice often depends on the prescriber’s preference and personal experience,” said Hanno Tan, cardiologist at the Academic Medical Center.

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A drug commonly used to treat high blood pressure and chest pain could be associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest, according to a study. Pixabay

The findings are surprising given that both the drugs have been in use for many years.

However, the researchers urged caution when interpreting the results.

Also Read: Planning A Major Vigil And Memorial, Place to Grieve for Shaken Christchurch Residents

“The findings need to be replicated in other studies before action could be taken by doctors or patients,” Tan said.

In sudden cardiac arrest, the heart stops pumping after a cardiac arrhythmia (ventricular fibrillation/tachycardia). This can be lethal if untreated. (IANS)