Monday June 17, 2019

Can Sleeping More Affect Your Heart?

While sleeping more raised triglycerides levels in both men and women, in women it led to higher waist circumference, blood sugar as well as lower levels of "good" cholesterol

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Can Sleeping More Affect Your Heart?
Can Sleeping More Affect Your Heart? Pixabay

If you thought that only less hours of sleep would affect your health, then you are wrong. Sleeping more than 10 hours per day is also associated with metabolic syndrome, raising the risk for heart diseases, according to a new study.

Those who slept for over 10 hours daily were at risk of elevated waist circumference, high triglyceride levels — a type of fat, low levels of “good” cholesterol, hypertension as well as high fasting blood sugar — referred to as metabolic syndrome and associated with increased risk of cardiovascular diseases.

While sleeping more raised triglycerides levels in both men and women, in women it led to higher waist circumference, blood sugar as well as lower levels of “good” cholesterol.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

Conversely, getting less than six hours of sleep was associated with higher risk of metabolic syndrome in men and higher waist circumference among both men and women, researchers said.

“This is the largest study examining a dose-response association between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome and its components separately for men and women,” said lead author Claire E. Kim from Seoul National University College of Medicine in South Korea.

Also Read: Study: Sleeping For 7 Hours to Keep Your Heart Younger

The study, published in the journal BMC Public Health, included data from 1,33,608 participants aged between 40-69 years. The results showed that the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was just over 29 per cent in men and 24.5 per cent in women.

“We observed a potential gender difference between sleep duration and metabolic syndrome, with an association between metabolic syndrome and long sleep in women and metabolic syndrome and short sleep in men,” said Kim. (IANS)

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Less Than 7 Hours of Sleep Bad for Your Heart, Warn Researchers

The results suggest that microRNAs in blood could be used as a marker of cardiovascular disease in people with insufficient sleep

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Soothing colours, right scent aid sound sleep. Pixabay

People who sleep less than seven hours each night are at higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and coronary heart disease, warn researchers.

The findings, published in the journal Experimental Physiology, show that people who sleep fewer than seven hours per night have lower blood levels of three physiological regulators, or microRNAs, which influence gene expression and play a key role in maintaining vascular health.

“This study proposes a new potential mechanism through which sleep influences heart health and overall physiology,” said Christopher DeSouza, Professor at University of Colorado in the US.

For the study, the research team took blood samples from a small group of healthy men and women, age 44 to 62, who had filled out questionnaires about their sleep habits.

While half of the participants slept seven to 8.5 hours nightly, the other half slept five to 6.8 hours every night.

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Less than 7 hours of sleep linked to hardened arteries. Pixabay

The research team measured the expression of nine microRNAs previously associated with inflammation, immune function or vascular health.

They found that people with insufficient sleep had 40 to 60 per cent lower circulating levels of miR-125A, miR-126, and miR-146a than those who slept enough.

“Why seven or eight hours seems to be the magic number is unclear. However, it is plausible that people need at least seven hours of sleep per night to maintain levels of important physiological regulators, such as microRNAs,” DeSouza added.

Also Read- Soy-rich Food Decrease Risk of Bone Fractures in Breast Cancer Survivors

“They are like cellular brakes, so if beneficial microRNAs are lacking that can have a big impact on the health of the cell,” DeSouza said.

The results suggest that microRNAs in blood could be used as a marker of cardiovascular disease in people with insufficient sleep. (IANS)