Friday December 13, 2019

Cancer Linked With Internal Bleeding After Heart Attack

Bleeding during the first six months after discharge from hospital for a heart attack is linked with a subsequent cancer diagnosis

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Heart attack, internal bleeding Cancer
Cancer could be the reason behind internal bleeding after Heart attack. Pixabay

Bleeding during the first six months after discharge from hospital for a heart attack is linked with a subsequent cancer diagnosis, a new study said.

“Our results suggest that patients should seek medical advice if they experience bleeding after discharge.

“Particularly if the bleeding is of gastrointestinal, pulmonary or genitourinary origin, without any obvious reason, and occurs in the first six months. If the cause is cancer, early detection can improve prognosis,” said study author Isabel Munoz Pousa from Alvaro Cunqueiro Hospital in Spain.

Following the discharge for an acute coronary syndrome — heart attack or unstable angina — patients are typically treated with dual antiplatelet therapy for around one year.

This treatment inhibits the formation of blood clots but raises the risk of bleeding.

internal bleeding, Heart Disease, Heart Failure
The median time from bleeding to cancer was 4.6 months. The link with cancer increased as the severity of bleeding worsened. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers retrospectively reviewed the hospital records of 3,644 acute coronary syndrome patients discharged with dual antiplatelet therapy from Alvaro Cunqueiro Hospital.

Patients were followed-up for a median of 56.2 months for bleeding events and cancer.

The researchers analysed associations between bleeding and the absolute risk of a new cancer diagnosis.

Bleeding occurred in 1,215 patients — 33 per cent during follow-up and 227 patients (6 per cent) had a new diagnosis of cancer.

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After adjustment for factors known to influence bleeding or cancer, post-discharge bleeding was associated with a threefold higher risk of a new cancer diagnosis.

The median time from bleeding to cancer was 4.6 months. The link with cancer increased as the severity of bleeding worsened.

Spontaneous bleeding with no apparent cause was linked with four times higher risk of a cancer diagnosis.

“Most of the bleeding episodes in the study were mild. The bleeding events more strongly related with a new cancer diagnosis were severe haemorrhages of unknown cause requiring surgery — for example digestive bleeding needing endoscopic treatment,” Pousa said.

The study was presented at the ESC Congress 2019 in Paris on August 31. (IANS)

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Development of Alzheimer’s Disease Not Totally Linked to Genetics: Study

The research team analyzed the gene sequence and the biological age of the body's cells from blood

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Genetics
With additional funding, researchers could further explore the interaction between Genetics and environment in the development of Alzheimer's disease and the impact of environmental factors in delaying the onset of this disorder. Pixabay

The colour of our eyes or the straightness of our hair is linked to our DNA, but the development of Alzheimer’s disease isn’t exclusively linked to Genetics, suggest new research.

In the first study published about Alzheimer’s disease among identical triplets, researchers found that despite sharing the same DNA, two of the triplets developed Alzheimer’s while one did not.

The two triplets that developed Alzheimer’s were diagnosed in their mid-70s, said the paper published in the journal Brain.

“These findings show that your genetic code doesn’t dictate whether you are guaranteed to develop Alzheimer’s,” said Dr Morris Freedman, head of neurology at Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.

“There is hope for people who have a strong family history of dementia since there are other factors, whether it’s the environment or lifestyle, we don’t know what it is, which could either protect against or accelerate dementia.”

All three, 85-year-old siblings had hypertension, but the two with Alzheimer’s had long-standing, obsessive-compulsive behaviour.

The research team analyzed the gene sequence and the biological age of the body’s cells from blood that was taken from each of the triplets, as well as the children of one of the triplet’s with Alzheimer’s.

Genetics
The colour of our eyes or the straightness of our hair is linked to our DNA, but the development of Alzheimer’s disease isn’t exclusively linked to Genetics, suggest new research. Pixabay

Among the children, one developed early onset Alzheimer’s disease at age 50 and the other did not report signs of dementia.

The research team also discovered that although the triplets were octogenarians at the time of the study, the biological age of their cells was six to ten years younger than their chronological age.

In contrast, one of the triplet’s children, who developed early onset Alzheimer’s, had a biological age that was nine years older than the chronological age.

The other child, who did not have dementia, of the same triplet showed a biological age that was close to their actual age.

Genetic
Your Genetic code doesn’t dictate whether you are guaranteed to develop Alzheimer’s Disease. Pixabay

“The latest genetics research is finding that the DNA we die with isn’t necessarily what we received as a baby, which could relate to why two of the triplets developed Alzheimer’s and one didn’t,” says Dr. Ekaterina Rogaeva, senior author on the paper and researcher at the University of Toronto’s Tanz Centre for Research in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

“As we age, our DNA ages with us and as a result, some cells could mutate and change over time”.

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With additional funding, researchers could further explore the interaction between genetics and environment in the development of Alzheimer’s disease and the impact of environmental factors in delaying the onset of this disorder. (IANS)