Wednesday January 29, 2020

“The Cancer Cells Have An Unlimited Appetite For Nutrients,” said Xiaoyong Yang, Professor at Yale

Scientists at Yale Cancer Scientists have uncovered the workings of a metabolic pathway or "gauge" that lets cancer cells detect when they have enough nutrients around them to grow

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Cancer, cells, metabolism, research, treatment, science
the workings of a metabolic pathway or "gauge" that lets cancer cells detect when they have enough nutrients around them to grow.. Pixabay

Scientists at Yale Cancer Scientists at Yale Cancer Center in the US have uncovered the workings of a metabolic pathway or “gauge” that lets cancer cells detect when they have enough nutrients around them to grow.

The researchers hope that drugs designed to turn down the gauge may eventually aid in treating many forms of cancer.

“The cancer cell has an unlimited appetite for nutrients,” said Xiaoyong Yang, Associate Professor at Yale Cancer Center and senior author of the study.

Cancer, cells, metabolism, research, treatment, science
Cancer cells in culture from human connective tissue, illuminated by darkfield amplified contrast, at a magnification of 500x. These cells can be compared to normal cells. Wikimedia Commons

“But in many parts of the body, especially for solid tumours, nutrients and oxygen are often limited, so the cell has to make a decision to grow or survive. We have shown how the cell adapts to its microenvironment, detecting nutrient availability to make this decision,” Yang said.

Yang and his colleagues studied the role of a process called O-GlcNAc protein modification in cancer metabolism.

O-GlcNAc modification alters the function of proteins by attaching certain kinds of sugar molecules and is thought to generally act as a nutrient sensor for the cell.

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“We were interested in this modification because it is a common feature across many types of cancer,” Yang noted.

The team began by examining a wide range of human cancer tissue samples for signs of O-GlcNAc modification, including levels of expression for the OGT and OGA enzymes.

They found that both OGT and OGA are expressed at higher levels in many cancers than in normal tissues.

Their findings were published in the journal Oncogene. (IANS)

Next Story

Weight-Loss Surgery May Help in Reducing Risk of Colorectal Cancer: Study

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals

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Cancer
Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer. Pixabay

Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

The study, published in the British Journal of Surgery (BJS), showed that patients who underwent bariatric surgery had a greater than 35 per cent reduction in the risk of developing colorectal cancer compared with obese individuals who had no surgery.

“Day by day, the scientific community is continuing to uncover the benefits of weight- loss surgery, and this paper affirms this,” said study lead author Sulaiman Almazeedi from Jaber Al-Ahmed Hospital in Kuwait.

“Obesity today remains one of the most preventable causes of morbid disease and early death, and despite the controversy, we believe weight-loss surgery can be an important tool in tackling this epidemic,” Almazeedi added.

Obesity increases the risk of many medical conditions, including Type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and most cancers, including colorectal cancer.

According to the researchers, the BJS analysis, which included seven studies with a total of 12,13,727 patients and an average follow-up of seven years, was conducted because individual studies have presented conflicting results.

Cancer
Researchers have found found that weight-loss surgery may reduce by over one third the risk of developing colorectal cancer. Pixabay

This meta analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of bariatric surgery on the risk of developing colorectal cancer in obese individuals.

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The overall risk of developing colorectal cancer was three in 1,000 in patients with obesity who underwent weight-loss surgery, compared with four in 1,000 in those who did not, the study said. (IANS)