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Canon Finds The Growth of Smartphone Sector As a Great Opportunity

According to a company survey, in 2017 unit sales of interchangeable-lens cameras in the global camera market reached approximately 11,400,000 units. In 2018, the sales are expected to again reach approximately 11,000,000 units

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Canon
DSLR leader Canon brings its first mirrorless camera to India.

More and more people, especially the millennials, are clicking photos via smartphones and for the Japanese camera giant Canon, this has created a huge market to tap as these people now want to experience something bigger and better which the camera and imaging pioneer can easily provide.

In 2017, nearly 1.3 trillion photos were taken globally — from 660 billion in 2013 — and most of the images were taken via smartphones.

“Today, more and more people are buying high-end cameras to rev up their smartphone experience. There will soon be more digital natives in the 10-50 age bracket than ever before.

“Our aim is to acquire the new generation in order to create new businesses and enhance our EOS camera ecosystem,” emphasised Go Tokura, Executive Officer and Chief Executive, Image Communication Business Operations at Canon.

Addressing a select gathering at the Canon headquarters here, Tokura said the company is aiming to build a brand new imaging world where high-end smartphones are deciding the future of camera experience.

Canon
Canon. (IANS)

In India, over 400 million people are smartphone users and more than 700 million people have feature phones who will eventually shift to smartphones for a better experience.

“Although the compact and entry-level camera market is shrinking owing to smartphones, professional and premium camera market is actually growing and our EOS series has been a phenomenal success,” Tokura told the audience.

According to the Japan-based Camera Imaging Products Association (CIPA), the shipment number of digital cameras dropped a massive 23 per cent in July this year compared to the same period last year.

On the other hand, the professional camera market is growing.

“We have sold 90 million EOS cameras and 130 million EF lens so far. We have been building EOS cameras for the past 30 years and today, we have achieved high speed, ease of use and high-image quality for end users,” informed the Canon executive.

Entering the high-end full-frame mirrorless camera market, Canon on September 5 launched the EOS R — along with four RF lenses and four types of mount adapters — that ensures higher image quality and enhanced usability.

The EOS R, which will be launched in India on September 21, employs the newly-developed RF Mount. A large (54 mm) mount internal diameter and short back focus allows for an enhanced communication between the lens and camera body.

Canon
Representational image.

The Canon EOS R has a 30.3MP Full-frame CMOS sensor and an ISO range of 100 to 40,000 (expandable up to 50-102,400).

“This is a low-light marvel. The Dual Pixel CMOS AF ensures high operability and precision. The camera is built for an advanced video/movie recording in 4K UHD,” said Yoshiyuki Mizoguchi, Group Executive, ICB Products Group, Imaging Communications Business Operations, Canon.

According to a company survey, in 2017 unit sales of interchangeable-lens cameras in the global camera market reached approximately 11,400,000 units. In 2018, the sales are expected to again reach approximately 11,000,000 units.

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“For the young millennials, we have launched three concept models this year: MF telephoto camera, intelligent company camera and an outdoor activity camera.

“Then there are wearable cameras, AWS DeepLens (a deep learning enabled video camera), Google Clips, Galaxy Gear 360 and camera-equipped drones where we are present. Canon has already taken a giant leap for the future,” Tokura noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Usage of Smartphones for Eye Check-up May Lead to Misdiagnosis

However, when the images were calibrated, the differences between lighting levels and camera types were significantly minimalised - with differences between smartphones reduced by approximately 30 per cent

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Using smartphones to capture photographs of patients’ eyes for check-up may lead to misdiagnosis as camera colour sensors vary and as a result, images of the same eye may appear different depending on the model of smartphone used, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests that calibration of phone cameras is vital to capture accurate data.

Eye examinations to look for redness in the eye can indicate a variety of conditions including conjunctivitis, dry-eye disease and tear-gland dysfunction.

Clinicians increasingly use smartphones in conjunction with ophthalmic imaging equipment, such as the eyepiece of a slit lamp, because of their portability, ease of use and relatively low cost.

The connectivity also allows for upload to the Cloud, which is useful for telemedicine – the remote diagnosis and treatment of patients using telecommunications technology – and Artificial Intelligence applications that store thousands of images from different institutions.

However, the autofocus algorithms and hardware specifications of cameras may be different for different manufacturers which means different cameras can produce different results for the same scene.

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“It is important that clinicians bear this in mind,” said lead study author Carles Otero from Anglia Ruskin University in England.

For the study, the researchers took 192 images of eyes using three smartphone cameras, two different lighting levels and two zoom levels.

The images were duplicated and one set was white balanced and colour corrected (calibrated) and the other left unaltered.

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The researchers took photographs in autofocus mode with the iPhone 6s, the Google Nexus 6p and the Bq Aquaris U Lite, and found that the iPhone results were significantly different from the other two devices, when computing relative redness of each eye, and when compared to a clinician’s diagnosis.

However, when the images were calibrated, the differences between lighting levels and camera types were significantly minimalised – with differences between smartphones reduced by approximately 30 per cent.

“Our results show that while the clinician’s subjective evaluation was not affected by different cameras, lighting conditions or optical magnifications, calibration of a smartphone’s camera is essential when extracting objective data from images,” Otero said. (IANS)