Sunday August 25, 2019

‘Higher education in Indian languages aspirational’

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Rohan Joshi, first from the left (Image: Sapan Kapoor, NewsGram)

New Delhi: In a bid to propose improvements to the New Education Policy that the Ministry of Human Resource and Development (MHRD) is currently developing to make India a knowledge superpower, seventh School Choice National Conference took place in the national capital on Saturday. NewsGram spoke to Rohan Joshi, the Head of the Research vertical of Centre for Civil Society, on the need to provide education to children in Indian languages.

We also asked him whether his organization would urge the government to work in this direction in the future. Joshi said they would not recommend the government to have higher education in mother tongues although it was “certainly aspirational.”

The School Choice is an initiative of Centre for Civil Society to advocate element of competition in education space through policy reform and create an environment where every child has the Right to Education of Choice.

Here’s the interview with Rohan Joshi.

Q: Studies show that children learn the best in their mother tongue. If a child in South Korea can become a doctor after studying in Korean, why cannot a boy in a Tamil Nadu hamlet become one after studying in Tamil? What are your views on this?

Ans: It’s not a factual statement to make that children are not learning in their mother tongues because apart from a few states we actually don’t have government English medium schools. So the children who attend the government schools essentially study in the vernacular medium that is in their mother tongue at primary level.

Q: That’s at the primary level. Why should not they get the chance to pursue higher studies in their mother tongues? Why can’t students learn science in their own languages?

Ans: The clear issue here is having that curriculum developed in mother tongues. We ought to remember that this also has a correlation with livelihoods of the people because what happens is that at the primary stage it is more about the acquisition of competency, skills and knowledge. However, as you go towards higher education it starts getting far more driven by livelihood like what do they earn out of it.

And unfortunately, or fortunately, the language of transaction and livelihood at the moment is English. And it is actually true about a lot more other countries, not just India, where we can see a clear shift towards English medium education. I am just not talking about developing countries here but also about developed countries. For instance, in Spain and Italy where knowledge is available in Spanish and Italian, the conspicuous shift is towards English medium education.

Q: But countries like China seem to be doing pretty well by learning in their own language.

Ans: If you look at overall data China is an outlier. China is not a standard example because a shift is happening towards English there as well. Is it good or bad? I would say if it is serving the purpose and as you move up the education ladder the parental expectation is that children should be equipped with necessary skills for the job roles they would be performing in the near future.

Q: New Education Policy aims to provide affordable, quality education to all the children of India, irrespective of their backgrounds. How can a costly English education achieve this purpose?

Ans: It is not that English education is costly. Higher education, in general, is expensive. So even if it is a vernacular medium education, there’s no guarantee that it is going to be cheap.

Q: Should we make a shift towards learning in our mother tongues instead of a foreign language like English?

Ans: No, I do not think English is a foreign language anymore in India because we have pretty much internalized it. It is not this or that. You can actually teach both, English and mother tongue. Human beings are multilingual creatures and are capable of learning many languages. Is higher education in mother tongue good? Is it aspirational? It is certainly aspirational. I am not saying children should not have education in the mother tongue; they must have an option. At the same time making it compulsory is not the way because then you try to force it upon parents who do not seem to be willing for this at the moment.

Q: Would you recommend the government to chalk out a plan to have education in Indian languages?

Ans: For higher education ‘no’ and for school education definitely ‘yes’. As for higher education, it is not because we do not want to, but because that is not a concern for us. It’s an aspiration. We understand that people want their language to advance. The issue is we put too much burden on education to serve all the purposes. For instance, if people wish to show love for their language, it can also happen outside schools. Isn’t it?

We would like the New Education Policy to focus on the quality of education among other things. That is the need of the hour.

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Global E-commerce Giant Amazon Opened Its Largest Campus in Hyderabad

Amazon unveils its largest campus in Hyderabad

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Siddharth Nambiar, Director of Category Management, Amazon India said: "Now, customers can order the freshest fruits and vegetables as well as everyday grocery and get it within 2 hours. Pixabay

Global e-commerce giant Amazon opened its largest and first campus outside the US, here on Wednesday.

The 9.5-acre campus, located in Nanakramguda, will house over 15,000 employees. Amazon has 62,000 employees in India. With 1.8 million sq feet office space built over 3 million sq ft area, it’s Amazon’s single largest building in the world in terms of area.

It was inaugurated by Telangana Home Minister Mohammed Mahmood Ali, Amazon Vice-President Global Real Estate and Facilities Director John Schoettler and Amazon-India Senior Vice-President and Country Manager Amit Agarwal.

“Over the last 15 years we have invested significantly in India across 30 office spaces, the AWS APAC region in Mumbai, 50 fulfilment centres in 13 states as well as hundreds of delivery and sorting centres, creating nearly 200,000 jobs,” said Agarwal.

The facility will have the largest employee base outside the US.

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The facility will have the largest employee base outside the US. Pixabay

Schoettler said the campus was built in three years. It has interfaith prayer rooms, mother’s room, quiet rooms, showers, helipad and an all-day open cafeteria. It’s designed to facilitate inclusion and diversity, he added.

Also Read: Several 10th Gen Mobile PC Chips Unveiled by Intel

Amazon has its largest India fulfilment centre in Hyderabad. Spread over 400,000 sq ft, it’s located near the Rajiv Gandhi International Airport. The company plans to expand it to 580,000 sq ft by next year.

Amazon now has 4 million sq ft office space at eight centres in Hyderabad, excluding the fulfilment centre. (IANS)