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Kargil Hero Captain Neikezhakuo Kenguruse

By Ila Garg

Kargil War Heroes – Part 3



Kargil Hero Captain Neikezhakuo Kenguruse

A name rarely talked about among the Kargil martyrs is Captain Neikezhakuo Kenguruse. The soldier was born in Nagaland on 15 July 1974. He was called ‘Neibu’ by his family and friends and the north Indian soldiers who served under him fondly addressed him as ‘Nimbu Sahab’.

His bravery in the Kargil war can never be wiped out from the pages of history. He was awarded with the Maha Vir Chakra for his determination and prowess.

His moment of valour came when he was made a part of ‘Operation Vijay’. On the fateful night of 28 June 1999, he was the Ghatak platoon commander during the attack on area ‘Black Rock’ in icy heights of the Drass Sector.

Without thinking of his own safety, he volunteered to undertake a daring commando mission which involved attacking an enemy machine gun position on a cliff face. As the commando team scaled the cliff, Captain’s boots lost grip because of the slippery surface. But nothing can stop a soldier when he is at a mission.

At a height of 16,000 feet and a temperature of -10 degrees, he kicked off his shoes and somehow climbed up while carrying with him a rocket launcher with which he fired at the enemy position. He emerged as a true inspiration for his platoon when despite the hurdles, he killed four enemy soldiers. It was then that a bullet hit him hard, but before falling off the cliff, he had done enough damage to the enemy and proved his mettle.


His troops went on to capture the Lone Hill. When the mission was accomplished, they dedicated the victory to ‘Nimbu Sahab’. His daredevil act is exemplary for his troops as well as the whole nation. He was the true spirited warrior for his state and country.

His family never thought that he would don the military uniform one day, but when he did, he made them proud. His family has no qualms now. Their son has secured a place in millions of hearts across the nation and will continue to live there. In his last letter to his father, he wrote – “I may not be able to return home to be a part of our family again. Even if I don’t make it, do not grieve for me because I have already decided to give my best for the nation.” Soldiers like him are not born everyday. His brave contribution during the war is undeniable.

Capt. Neikezhakuo Kenguruse was just 25 when he breathed his last. His story should be an encouragement for the young generation to follow in his footsteps.

More in this segment:

Kargil War Heroes – Part 1
Kargil War Heroes – Part 2
Kargil War Heroes – Part 4
Kargil War Heroes – Part 5
Kargil War Heroes – Part 6
Kargil War Heroes – Part 7
Kargil War Heroes – Part 8
Kargil War Heroes – Part 9
Kargil War Heroes – Part 10
Kargil War Heroes – Part 11
Kargil War Heroes – Part 12
Kargil War Heroes – Part 13
Kargil War Heroes – Part 14
Kargil War Heroes – Part 15


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