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Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with Covid-19 and is associated with poor survival. Unsplash

Cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with Covid-19 and is associated with poor survival, particularly among patients aged 80 or older, say researchers.

The findings, published in the journal The BMJ, could help guide end-of-life care discussions with critically ill patients with Covid-19 and their families, say the researchers.


For the study, the research team from Michigan University in the US set out to estimate the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes associated with in-hospital cardiac arrest and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in critically ill adults with Covid-19.

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Their findings are based on data for 5,019 critically ill patients (aged 18 years or over) with Covid-19 admitted to intensive care units at 68 hospitals across the United States. The results show that 701 (14 per cent) of patients had in-hospital cardiac arrest within 14 days of admission to the intensive care unit, of whom only 400 (57 per cent) received CPR.

“Patients who had in-hospital cardiac arrest were older (average age 63 v 60 years), had more underlying health conditions (comorbidities), and were more likely to be admitted to a hospital with fewer intensive care unit beds,”

the study authors wrote.

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Importantly, this suggests that hospital resources, staffing, expertise, strain, or other factors not captured in this study, could have had a major impact, the researchers noted. Patients who received CPR were younger than those who did not (average age 61 v 67 years). Among those who did receive CPR, only 12 per cent (48 out of 400) survived to hospital discharge, and the only seven per cent (28 out of 400) did so with normal or mildly impaired neurological status.


The results show that 701 (14 per cent) of patients had in-hospital cardiac arrest within 14 days of admission to the intensive care unit. Unsplash

Most patients who survived to hospital discharge needed only a short course of CPR. Survival also differed by age, with 21 per cent of patients younger than 45 years surviving compared with three per cent of those aged 80 or older.

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The researchers pointed to some limitations, such as being unable to assess the quality and timeliness of CPR and limiting data to the first 14 days after intensive care unit admission, potentially underestimating the true rate of cardiac arrest. However, strengths included the use of high quality, detailed data for a large number of patients who were followed until death or discharge.

However, the researchers noted that cardiac arrest is common in critically ill patients with Covid-19 and is associated with poor survival even when CPR is provided. (IANS)


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Photo by Rob Pumphrey on Unsplash

Basil Leaves

Basil scientifically called Ocimum basilicum, and also known as great basil, is a culinary herb from the Lamiaceae (mints) family. A common aromatic herb, it is usually used to add flavor to a variety of recipes, but what may astonish one is that there are various health benefits of basil that make it well-known for its immunity-enhancing properties.

Basil seeds or basil essential oil are proven to help prevent a wide range of health conditions, which makes it one of the most essential medical herbs known today. Basil has vitamin A, C, E, K, and Omega 3 components including cooling components too. It also contains minerals like Copper, Calcium, Manganese, Phosphorus, Zinc, and Potassium. An ancient Ayurvedic herb, basil has various proven benefits including being anti-inflammatory, ant-oxidant, immune-booster, pain-reducer, and blood vessel-protector.

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This herb also contains cooling components thus making it really helpful for summers. It detoxifies the body and maintains one's body temperature pace. Adding to the benefits Basil contains antioxidant-rich volatile essential oils, which are considered hydrophobic, meaning they don't dissolve in water and are light and small enough to travel through the air and the pores within our skin. Basil's volatile essential oil is something that gives the herb its distinct smell and taste, but basil contains some great healing properties.

In the long history of Ayurveda, basil seeds were also called tukmaria seeds. These seeds may support one's gut health, may complete one's fiber quota, reduce blood sugar, help in weight loss, and also reduce cholesterol.

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When you're pregnant, the immune system is seeing the placenta for the first time in decades.

The US researchers have discovered a class of immune cells that plays a role in miscarriage, which affects about a quarter of pregnancies.

Researchers at the University of California-San Francisco found that the recently discovered subset of cells known as extrathymic Aire-expressing cells in the immune system may prevent the mother's immune system from attacking the placenta and fetus.

The researchers showed that pregnant mice who did not have this subset of cells were twice as likely to miscarry, and in many of these pregnancies fetal growth was severely restricted.

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"When you're pregnant, the immune system is seeing the placenta for the first time in decades -- not since the mother made a placenta when she herself was a fetus," said Eva Gillis-Buck, from UCSF.

"Our research suggests that this subset of immune cells is carrying out a sort of 'secondary education' -- sometimes many years after the better-known population of the educator cells have carried out the primary education in the thymus -- teaching T cells not to attack the fetus, the placenta and other tissues involved in pregnancy," she added. The findings are published in the journal Science Immunology.

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