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Cardiac arrest may be fatal for those living in high rise buildings

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New York: Survival rates from cardiac arrest decrease the higher up the building a person lives, warns a new study.

“Cardiac arrests that occur in high-rise buildings pose unique barriers for 911 — the emergency telephone number for the North American Numbering Plan, initiated first responders,” said lead author Ian Drennan, researcher with Rescu at the St. Michael’s Hospital in Ontario, Canada.

Building access issues, elevator delays and extended distance from the emergency vehicle to the patient can all contribute to longer times for 911-initiated first responders to reach the patient and start time-sensitive, potentially life-saving resuscitation, the researchers explained.

The number of people living in high-rise building grew by 13 percent in Toronto, in 2006- 2011.

Many of those people are older, with higher rates of serious medical issues and higher risk of cardiac arrest.

The researchers found that only 3.8 percent adults survived, out of a data of 8,216 adults (from January 2007 to December 2012), after suffering an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and were treated by 911-initiated first responders in Toronto and Peel Region.

Survival was 4.2 percent for people living below the third floor and 2.6 percent for people living on or above the third floor.

Survival above the 16th floor was 0.9 per cent (of 216 cases, only two survived). There were no survivors to hospital discharge of the 30 cardiac arrests above the 25th floor.

“Patients who survived tended to be younger, their cardiac arrest was more often witnessed by bystanders, and bystanders were more likely to perform Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) — a lifesaving technique useful in especially in heart attack,” Drennan said.

The paper was published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. (IANS)

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Heart Attack Risk on The Rise for Pregnant Women and Death Rate Remains High

Patients should work out a plan with their physicians to monitor and control risk factors during pregnancy so that they can minimize their risk

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These findings provide the first biomarker-based evidence that maternal exposure to insecticides is associated with autism among offspring
These findings provide the first biomarker-based evidence that maternal exposure to insecticides is associated with autism among offspring. Pixabay

The risk of having a heart attack while pregnant, giving birth, or during two months after delivery, continues to increase, a US-based study has found.

The findings, published in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings, suggest that the trend among many women to have children later in life is one possible reason for the increase, as the3 heart attack risk rises with age overall, and especially during pregnancy.

“Our analysis, the largest review in a decade, serves as an important reminder of how stressful pregnancy can be on the female body and heart, causing a lot of physiological changes, and potentially unmasking risk factors that can lead to heart attack,” said co-author Sripal Bangalore from the New York University Langone Health.

According to the researchers, an increased number of women are obese or have diabetes, which are the key risk factors for a heart attack.

highlight the importance to women considering pregnancy to know their risk factors for heart disease beforehand,
It highlights the importance to women considering pregnancy to know their risk factors for heart disease beforehand. Pixabay

For the study, the researchers examined 49,829,753 births recorded in hospitals — where the majority of deliveries in the US take place — and found that 1,061 heart attacks happened during labour and delivery.

They also found that another 922 women were hospitalized for myocardial infarction before birth, and 2,390 heart attacks occurred during the recovery period after birth.

The researcher said that although the absolute number of heart attacks and deaths from them remain low, the persistence of the relatively high death rate (unchanged at 4.5 per cent of cases) comes despite advances in treating heart attacks with drug-coated stents and improved use of blood-thinning medications to prevent heart-vessel blockages.

Also Read: Being Positive During Pregnancy May Lead to Kids Being in Shape: Study

“Our findings highlight the importance to women considering pregnancy to know their risk factors for heart disease beforehand,” said lead author Nathaniel Smilowitz from the varsity.

“These patients should work out a plan with their physicians to monitor and control risk factors during pregnancy so that they can minimize their risk,” Smilowitz noted. (IANS)

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