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CBFC changes name for certifying Padmavati and made several cuts

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CBFC changes name for certifying Padmavati and made several cuts
CBFC changes name for certifying Padmavati and made several cuts. IANS

Mumbai, Dec 30, 2017: The Central Board of Film Certification (CBFC) has decided to give a U/A certificate “along with some modifications” to Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s controversial film “Padmavati” and has asked the filmmaker to “likely” change the movie’s title to “Padmavat”. However, the suggestions have been slammed by a Mewar royal and some members of the film industry.

“Padmavati”, featuring Deepika Padukone as Rajput queen Padmavati, was also asked to give a few disclaimers — one of them regarding not glorifying the practice of Sati and also relevant modifications in the song “Ghoomar” to befit the character portrayed, a CBFC statement said on Saturday.

The decision was taken after an examining committee meeting was held on Thursday in the presence of CBFC chief Prasoon Joshi. The special panel consisted of Arvind Singh from Udaipur, Dr Chandramani Singh and Professor K.K. Singh of Jaipur University.

As per CBFC, the film was approached with a “balanced view keeping in mind both the filmmakers and the society”. The board asked for several cuts, and a name change, before giving the film the certification for showing in theaters in India. According to some reports, 26 cuts were ordered.

Considering the complexities and concerns around the film, the requirement for a special panel was felt by CBFC “to add perspective to the final decision of the official committee”, the CBFC said.

Earlier on November 30, Bhansali appeared before a parliamentary committee and said: “All the controversy over the film is based on rumours. I have not distorted facts. The film is based on a poem by Malik Muhammad Jayasi,” referring to the 16th century Indian sufi poet’s epic poem “Padmavat”.

The certificate will be issued once the required modifications are carried out and final material submitted, the board said.

However, the suggestions from CBFC were slammed by a Mewar royal, who expressed his disappointment in a letter to Prasoon Joshi — a copy of which is with IANS.

Maharajkumar Vishvaraj Singh, son of Mahendra Singh Mewar — the 76th Maharana of the Mewar dynasty and a former Lok Sabha member — said he was supposed to be a part of the committee on Thursday, but couldn’t make it in the end, and the decision was taken by the censor board without his consent.

Popular Bollywood celebrities like Anubhav Sinha, Renuka Shahane and Apurva Asrani, among others, also slammed CBFC’s decision on Twitter, where some people edited Deepika’s photograph with her co-star Ranveer Singh, referring to the new title, “Padmavat”.

“So Bhansali can now actually throw a party. Just that whisky will be called ‘whiska’, vodka will be called ‘vodki’ and so on,” Sinha tweeted.

Renuka wrote: “The ‘I’ of the storm has passed. CBFC changes the name of “Padmavati” to “Padmavat” and passes the film with a U/A certificate. Thereby, nobody will have any issue and nobody’s sentiments will be hurt. Name changing is game changing I must say!”

Filmmaker Rahul Dholakia was “disgusted” by CBFC’s decision.

“Disgusted by the open and blatant use of political muscle to screw filmmakers during elections. Now that Gujarat and Himachal are won, ‘Padmavati’ has got its U/A, it will be praised. Rajputs’ heroism will be talked about by the same people who slammed it. Thank God we have not made a film called Gandhi! Can you imagine what title CBFC would suggest,” he tweeted.

Asrani said: “If ‘Pad Man’ picks up the ‘I’ that ‘Padmavat’ drops, they’ll have to call it ‘Padmani’. From the frying pan into the pyre.”

Actor Rahul Dev felt similar and tweeted: “‘Padmavati’ turns ‘Padmavat’, smart move, yet wonder why is the ‘I’ so large in our country? CBFC gives U/A certificate for the film.”

“Padmavati”, which was earlier slated for release on December 1, got embroiled in controversy after the Karni Sena, an organisation of the Rajput community, urged a nationwide ban on the film claiming that it “distorts historical facts”.

Members of the political organisation also physically assaulted Bhansali during the film’s shooting in Jaipur earlier this year. They even burnt the sets of the movie on the outskirts of Mumbai.

The row took an ugly turn when threats were issued against Bhansali and Deepika. (IANS)

Next Story

Rajasthan’s Leading Properties Go Green To Follow The Sustainable Route

Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

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Famous Forts in India
Amer fort, Jaipur, Rajasthan (Pic Credits : Elene Machaidze)

From plastic straws to copper vessels, handmade lamps and bangles, Rajasthan’s leading hospitality players here are establishing new trends by engaging local artisans to showcase traditional artistry to guests and serving them locally-inspired cuisine amid green surroundings.

“We have initiated the use of paper-made straws; there is no use of plastic bags anywhere in the hotel property and the local-inspired food is being served to guests to ensure the locals have a regular source of income,” Binny Sebastian, General Manager, Bishangarh’s Alila Fort heritage hotel, some 50 km from here, told IANS.

Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

organic farming
Once a warrior fort, the management of the heritage property also engages the villagers in tasks like organic farming.

“Our association with the locals is quite strong. Working with them, we take our guests to the local temple. They also visit the artisans’ houses and sip tea there while watching them make pottery and weave carpet. In this way, we ensure that locals get a decent livelihood,” Sebastian added.

“We have started getting regular income since this property came up a year back. We have been showing our art to the guests here which gives us satisfaction as well as an income,” said Nizamuddin, a bangle maker.

Ashok S. Rathore, General Manager of the Rambagh Palace, said: “We have curtailed the use of plastic. There are no plastic straws being used on the property. We serve in glass bottles instead of plastic water bottles.”

This property is also adopting sustainable routes to ensure that the locals get decent income opportunities for their sustenance.

Famous forts in India
Chittorgarh Fort, Rajasthan (Wikimedia Commons)

“Our interiors are reminiscent of handmade interiors. Our suites are adorned with Thikri art, a rare gold-dipped miniature artwork of Rajasthan. But skilled artists are disappearing and it comes with a high cost of production,” said Rathore.

Also Read: Stop “Stereotyping” Northeast, States Hold Strong Cultural Harmony

Fairmont Jaipur has incorporated the fine craftsmanship and beauty of the local cultural heritage and artisans of Jaipur. The ceilings are hand-painted by local artisans with complex motifs.

“We associate with the local artisans to showcase their talent at the hotel in the form of the evening entertainment, the welcome experience and celebrate the local heritage of Rajasthan,” said Srijan Vadhera, General Manager, Fairmont Jaipur. (IANS)