Tuesday January 22, 2019
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Jack Dorsey, CEO of Twitter Personally Looking Over on High-Profile Accounts

After facing protests on its platform, Twitter had temporarily banned the account of Jones

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Twitter
New Twitter bug exposed Android users' private tweets. Pixabay

As Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey gets ready to testify before the US Congress on September 5, reports have surfaced that he is personally weighing in on high-profile decisions to ban controversial accounts, frustrating some employees.

According to a report in Wall Street Journal on Monday, Dorsey overruled a decision by his staff to ban the right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones.

He also reportedly “instructed his employees to let alt-right provocateur Richard Spencer keep one of his Twitter accounts after the trust and safety team kicked him off the platform in 2016”.

Twitter’s Chief Legal Officer Vijaya Gadde, however, disputed the report.

Twitter
Twitter on a smartphone device. VOA

“Any suggestion that Jack made or overruled any of these decisions is completely and totally false,” Gadde was quoted as saying in a statement.

Facing the heat from conservative commentators and lawmakers over alleged censoring of Republicans on Twitter, Dorsey has been called to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee about algorithms and content monitoring.

According to House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, “Social media platforms are increasingly serving as today’s town squares. But sadly, conservatives are too often finding their voices silenced”.

“One-sided conversations are an affront to the public mission that serve as the foundations for these social media platforms — including Twitter,” he said in a statement in August.

Later, Dorsey will also testify about election security along with Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg and a representative from Google before the Senate Intelligence Committee.

Twitter
Twitter on a smartphone device. Pixabay

In an interview with CNN, Dorsey said Twitter needs more resources to enact rules aimed at tackling heated political rhetoric on its platform.

He said Twitter did not take action against radio host Jones until reports came in, pointing out that he violated Twitter’s policies.

“As we receive reports, we take action,” Dorsey said.

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After facing protests on its platform, Twitter had temporarily banned the account of Jones.

US President Donald Trump also tweeted about the issue. “They are closing down the opinions of many people on the RIGHT, while at the same time doing nothing to others. Speaking loudly and clearly for the Trump Administration, we won’t let that happen,” tweeted Trump. (IANS)

Next Story

Russia’s Communication Watchdog Opens Administrative Proceedings Against Twitter, Facebook

In April last year, thousands rallied in Moscow in support of internet freedom after Russian authorities attempted to block access to the popular messaging app Telegram.

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Facebook, Fake News
A user gets ready to launch Facebook on an iPhone, in North Andover, Mass., June 19, 2017. Facebook has made changes to fight false information, including de-emphasizing proven false stories in people's feeds so others are less likely to see them. VOA

Russia’s communication watchdog, Roskomnadzor, opened “administrative proceedings” Monday against Facebook and Twitter for non-compliance with country’s data laws, Interfax news agency reported.

Roskomnadzor head Alexander Zharov is quoted as saying that U.S. social media giants have a month to comply or face legal proceedings.

According to Roskomnadzor, Facebook and Twitter have not explained how and when they would comply with legislation that requires all servers used to store Russians’ personal data to be located in Russia.

Facebook, data,photos
A television photographer shoots the sign outside of Facebook headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

Russia has introduced stricter internet laws in the past five years, among other things requiring search engines to share encryption keys with Russian security services.

Also Read: Twitter Rolls Out Reverse-chronological Timeline Option For Android

In April last year, thousands rallied in Moscow in support of internet freedom after Russian authorities attempted to block access to the popular messaging app Telegram.

Telegram had refused to give state intelligence services access to private conversations which are usually encrypted. (VOA)