Wednesday March 20, 2019

Changing Breakfast and Dinner Timings Might Help You in Loosing Weight

For the study, published in the Journal of Nutritional Sciences, the team conducted a 10-week experiment on 'time-restricted feeding' -- a form of intermittent fasting

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Breakfast
Can eating late breakfast, early dinner help in losing weight? Check it out here. Pixabay

Struggling to cut down your body fat? Eating breakfast late, but having an early dinner may help, suggests a pilot study.

The findings showed that people who delayed their breakfast by 90 minutes and had their dinner 90 minutes earlier than usual lost more than twice as much body fat on average.

Further, those who changed their meal times ate less food overall, than those who did not, the researchers said.

“Although this study is small, it has provided us with invaluable insight into how slight alterations to our meal times can have benefits to our bodies,” said Jonathan Johnston, from the UK’s University of Surrey.

“Reduction in body fat lessens our chances of developing obesity and related diseases, so is vital in improving our overall health,” he added.

Weight loss
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in the Journal of Nutritional Sciences, the team conducted a 10-week experiment on ‘time-restricted feeding’ — a form of intermittent fasting.

Participants were split into two groups – those who were required to delay their breakfast by 90 minutes and have their dinner 90 minutes earlier, and those who ate meals as they would normally (the controls).

Although there was no restriction on what the participants could eat, the team found that 57 per cent of participants showed a reduction in food intake either due to a reduced appetite, decreased eating opportunities or a cutback in snacking, particularly in the evenings.

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However, 57 per cent of participants felt they could not have maintained the new meal times beyond the prescribed 10 weeks because of their incompatibility with family and social life.

“Fasting diets are difficult to follow and may not always be compatible with family and social life. We therefore need to make sure they are flexible and conducive to real life, as the potential benefits of such diets are clear to see,” Johnston noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Secret of Maintaining Weight Loss

At the same average body weight, participants who consumed the low-carb diet burned about 250 kilocalories a day more than those on the high-carb diet

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Weight Loss
Here's the secret to maintaining weight loss. Pixabay

Staying in shape is no mean job as people often find that they quickly regain the weight that they had shed after a rigorous regime of dieting or exercise. Eating a diet low on carbohydrates may, however, help them maintain weight loss, new research has found.

This is because eating fewer carbohydrates increases the number of calories burned, said the study published in the journal BMJ.

For the study, the researchers from Boston Children’s Hospital in the US enrolled 234 overweight adults aged between 18 and 65 to an initial weight-loss diet for about 10 weeks.

Body Positivity is not only about feeling good about our own body type but also appreciating other body types as well. Pixabay
Representational image. Pixabay
 Of these, 164 achieved the goal of losing 10 to 14 per cent of body weight.

The participants were then randomised to follow high, moderate or low-carbohydrate diets for an additional 20 weeks with carbs comprising 60, 40 and 20 per cent of total calories, respectively.

The results showed that over the 20 weeks, calories burned was significantly greater on the low-carbohydrate diet versus the high-carbohydrate diet.

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At the same average body weight, participants who consumed the low-carb diet burned about 250 kilocalories a day more than those on the high-carb diet.

“If this difference persists – and we saw no drop-off during the 20 weeks of our study – the effect would translate into about a 20-pound weight loss after three years, with no change in calorie intake,” said Cara Ebbeling from Boston Children’s Hospital. (IANS)