Tuesday November 13, 2018

Changing Breakfast and Dinner Timings Might Help You in Loosing Weight

For the study, published in the Journal of Nutritional Sciences, the team conducted a 10-week experiment on 'time-restricted feeding' -- a form of intermittent fasting

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Breakfast
Can eating late breakfast, early dinner help in losing weight? Check it out here. Pixabay
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Struggling to cut down your body fat? Eating breakfast late, but having an early dinner may help, suggests a pilot study.

The findings showed that people who delayed their breakfast by 90 minutes and had their dinner 90 minutes earlier than usual lost more than twice as much body fat on average.

Further, those who changed their meal times ate less food overall, than those who did not, the researchers said.

“Although this study is small, it has provided us with invaluable insight into how slight alterations to our meal times can have benefits to our bodies,” said Jonathan Johnston, from the UK’s University of Surrey.

“Reduction in body fat lessens our chances of developing obesity and related diseases, so is vital in improving our overall health,” he added.

Weight loss
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in the Journal of Nutritional Sciences, the team conducted a 10-week experiment on ‘time-restricted feeding’ — a form of intermittent fasting.

Participants were split into two groups – those who were required to delay their breakfast by 90 minutes and have their dinner 90 minutes earlier, and those who ate meals as they would normally (the controls).

Although there was no restriction on what the participants could eat, the team found that 57 per cent of participants showed a reduction in food intake either due to a reduced appetite, decreased eating opportunities or a cutback in snacking, particularly in the evenings.

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However, 57 per cent of participants felt they could not have maintained the new meal times beyond the prescribed 10 weeks because of their incompatibility with family and social life.

“Fasting diets are difficult to follow and may not always be compatible with family and social life. We therefore need to make sure they are flexible and conducive to real life, as the potential benefits of such diets are clear to see,” Johnston noted. (IANS)

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Weight Loss Surgery To Combat Womb Cancer in Obese Women

"But for those that choose it, gastric sleeve or bypass surgery can now be seen as a preventative measure for womb cancer."

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Breast Cancer
Early rising women at lower risk of breast cancer: Study. Pixabay

Undergoing bariatric surgery to combat obesity can prevent women from developing womb cancer also known as uterine or endometrial cancer, claims a study.

The findings, led by scientists from the University of Manchester, showed that women who had gastric sleeve or bypass surgery for obesity found that precancerous tissue in their womb reverted to normal tissue when they lost weight.

“For super obese women, quick access to weight loss surgery has benefits beyond improving diabetes and risk of heart disease. It can also reduce womb cancer risk,” said Emma Crosbie, clinical senior lecturer from Manchester.

“Losing weight through dieting is also likely to be effective, but we know that dieting is very hard to do and weight lost is often re-gained,” she said.

In the study, published in International journal of Cancer, the team examined nearly 100 women with an average BMI of over 50 — considered to be super obese — had biopsies taken from their wombs during gastric sleeve or bypass surgery.

Obese post-menopausal women produce oestrogen from their fat stores. But as they no longer ovulate, the lack of progesterone allows the cells in the womb to grow, which increases the risk of cancer.

Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

Inflammatory responses and insulin production are also changed in obese women and can cause cells in the womb to grow.

“Because the reversal of precancerous changes in the womb was so quick, we think the metabolic consequences of weight loss surgery was crucial,” said Crosbie.

However, the researchers stressed that the surgical option was not for everyone, because it was no an easy choice.

You May Also Like to Read About- Processed Meat And Carbonated Beverages Puts You At Higher Risk of Kidney Failure

“It changes your relationship with food forever, as you’ll be eating smaller meals more frequently, and it is important to remember that surgery can be a hazardous procedure,” said Crosbie.

“But for those that choose it, gastric sleeve or bypass surgery can now be seen as a preventative measure for womb cancer.” (IANS)