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US marine attacks: 4 marines killed, gunman shot dead

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

In another grim reminder of the rising terror attacks in USA, a gunman opened fired on two military facilities at Chattanooga, Tennesse.

Four marines were killed in the attack, the US Navy said. The gunman identified as Mohammod Youssuf Abdulazeez, 24, was also shot dead.

“The gunman had numerous weapons and among those ‘brutally and brazenly attacked’ were members of the armed services,” Police chief Fred Fletcher said.

Officials at the news conference said that the shooting began at about 10:45 a.m. at one recruiting center on Lee Highway-inn and ended about 30 minutes later at the facility on Amnicola Highway, where all of the deaths occurred.

Photographs of the Amnicola facility showed the windows riddled with bullet holes.

“The federal investigators would take the lead on the case and the investigation would determine how the crime should be labeled,” said United States attorney Bill Killian.

Chattanooga, one of Tennesse’s largest cities, was unnerved by the attack as the Chattanooga State Community College posted an alert on its website that urged people on its main campus to remain inside and to close doors. Lee University, another university near Chattanooga, ordered a temporary lock down.

The mayor of Chattanooga, Andy Berke, later said a number of others had been wounded in the episode, including at least one police officer.

In the nearby suburb of Cleveland, Bradley Square Mall also said it had initiated a lock down, but the mall’s management said that local media reports of gunfire were inaccurate.

“There have been no shots fired at Bradley Square Mall and the lockdown was ‘a safety precaution’,” the mall’s Facebook page said.

In the meanwhile, the White House said that the president had been briefed by his national security staff on the Chattanooga shooting, and would continue to get updates as warranted.

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U.S. Commerce Department Recommends White House on How to Proceed with Auto Industry Tariffs

Some trade organizations also blasted the Commerce Department for keeping the details of its "Section 232" national security report shrouded in secrecy.

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Auto industry, tariffs
Robots swing a cab and bed into place for a new heavy duty pickup truck on the assembly line where Chevrolet Silverado trucks are being built at General Motors Flint Assembly in Flint, Michigan, Jan. 30, 2019. VOA

The U.S. auto industry urged President Donald Trump’s administration on Monday not to saddle imported cars and auto parts with steep tariffs, after the U.S. Commerce Department sent a confidential report to the White House late on Sunday with its recommendations for how to proceed.

Some trade organizations also blasted the Commerce Department for keeping the details of its “Section 232” national security report shrouded in secrecy, which will make it much harder for the industry to react during the next 90 days Trump will have to review it.

“Secrecy around the report only increases the uncertainty and concern across the industry created by the threat of tariffs,” the Motor and Equipment Manufacturers Association said in a statement, adding that it was “alarmed and dismayed.”

“It is critical that our industry have the opportunity to review the recommendations and advise the White House on how proposed tariffs, if they are recommended, will put jobs at risk, impact consumers, and trigger a reduction in U.S. investments that could set us back decades.”

Representatives from the White House and the Commerce Department could not immediately be reached.

Auto industry, tariffs
Some trade organizations also blasted the Commerce Department for keeping the details of its “Section 232” national security report shrouded in secrecy. VOA

The industry has warned that possible tariffs of up to 25 percent on millions of imported cars and parts would add thousands of dollars to vehicle costs and potentially devastate the U.S economy by slashing jobs.

Administration officials have said tariff threats on autos are a way to win concessions from Japan and the EU. Last year, Trump agreed not to impose tariffs as long as talks with the two trading partners were proceeding in a productive manner.

“We believe the imposition of higher import tariffs on automotive products under Section 232 and the likely retaliatory tariffs against U.S. auto exports would undermine – and not help – the economic and employment contributions that FCA, US, Ford Motor Company and General Motors make to the U.S. economy,” said former Missouri Governor Matt Blunt, the president of the American Automotive Policy Council.

ALSO READ: US States Sue Trump’s Administration for Obtaining Border Wall Funds

Some Republican lawmakers have also said they share the industry’s concerns. In a statement issued on Monday, Republican Congresswoman Jackie Walorski said she fears the Commerce Department’s report could “set the stage for costly tariffs on cars and auto parts.”

“President Trump is right to seek a level playing field for American businesses and workers, but the best way to do that is with a scalpel, not an axe,” she added. (VOA)