Wednesday January 29, 2020

Chatting on Food Habits Makes Kids Healthier: Study

For the study, the research team picked 87 children and ran an experiment where they offered healthy foods to a group of 3-to-5-year-old children for six weeks

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Avoid fad diet
Good food habits help you to strike balance between your daily life and health

Parents, please take note. Talking about food benefits is likely to get your kid to eat healthier, which might help them to grow bigger and run faster, says a study.

The study, published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behaviour, shows that the researchers found affirming statements were more effective at getting kids to make healthy food choices than presenting the food repeatedly without conversation.

The researchers found that kids ate twice as much healthy food when they were told how it would benefit them in terms they could understand as opposed to when they were given the food with no contextual information.

“Every child wants to be bigger, faster, able to jump higher,” said study lead author Jane Lanigan, Associate Professor at Washington State University in the US.

junk food, depression
Junk food is not only harmful for metabolism but also increases the risk of psychological problems. Pixabay

“Using these types of examples made the food more attractive to eat,” Lanigan said.

The researchers wanted to see if child-centred nutrition phrases (CCNPs), affirmative statements that simply convey the benefits of healthy food, influenced young children to make healthier food choices.

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For the study, the research team picked 87 children and ran an experiment where they offered healthy foods to a group of 3-to-5-year-old children for six weeks.

“We found that a month later, the kids ate twice as much of their CCNP food with the repeated exposure compared to the food without the positive words. For example, when we presented lentils we would say, ‘This will help you grow bigger and run faster’,” said Lanigan. (IANS)

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Exercise Addiction Common Among People With Eating Disorders: Study

Eating disorders are linked linked to exercise addiction

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Exercise addiction
Exercise addiction is defined as having an obsessive approach to fitness that could have a negative impact on someone's health and social life. Pixabay

Exercise addiction is nearly four times more common among people with an eating disorder, researchers have found as latest health news.

Exercise addiction was defined as having an obsessive approach to fitness that could have a negative impact on someone’s health and social life.

“It is known that those with eating disorders are more likely to display addictive personality and obsessive-compulsive behaviours,” said study lead author Mike Trott of Anglia Ruskin University in the UK.

“We are also aware that having an unhealthy relationship with food often means an increased amount of exercising, but this is the first time that a risk factor has been calculated,” Trott added.

Exercise addiction
Exercise addiction is nearly four times more common among people with an eating disorder. Pixabay

The study, published in Eating and Weight Disorders, drew on data from nine studies covering a total of 2,140 people with a mean age of 25.

The researchers found that people displaying characteristics of an eating disorder are 3.7 times more likely to suffer from addiction to exercise than people displaying no indication of an eating disorder.

“It is not uncommon to want to improve our lifestyles by eating healthier and doing more exercise, particularly at the start of the year. However, it is important to moderate this behaviour and not fall victim to ‘crash diets’ or anything that eliminates certain foods entirely, as these can easily lead to eating disorders,” Trott said.

According to the researchers, the study shows that displaying signs of an eating disorder significantly increases the chance of an unhealthy relationship with exercise, and this can have negative consequences, including mental health issues and injury.

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“Health professionals working with people with eating disorders should consider monitoring exercise levels as a priority, as this group have been shown to suffer from serious medical conditions as a result of excessive exercise, such as fractures, increased rates of cardiovascular disease in younger patients, and increased overall mortality,” Trott concluded. (IANS)