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Checkpost attack in China, 18 killed

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Beijing: At least 18 people died after ethnic Uighurs in northwestern China’s Xinjiang province attacked the police with knives and bombs at a traffic checkpoint.

The attack followed a government order banning a part of the region’s population from fasting during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, reports Efe.

Suspects killed several police officers with knives and bombs after speeding through a traffic checkpoint in a car in Kashgar’s Tahtakoruk district, US-based Radio Free Asia said, citing Turghun Memet, an officer at a nearby police station.

“Armed police responded to the attack and killed 15 suspects designated as terrorists,” Memet said.

The attack comes at the beginning of the Muslim holy month of Ramazan, a sensitive time in Xinjiang after an uptick in attacks over the past three years in which hundreds have died, blamed by Beijing on Islamist militants.

Exiled Uighur groups and human rights activists say repressive government policies in Xinjiang, including controls on Islam and on Uighur culture, have provoked unrest, a claim that Beijing denies.

(IANS)

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Google’s Censored Search Engine For China A ‘Stupid Move’ Says Ex-Employee

The tech giant had launched a search engine in China in 2006, but pulled the service out of the country in 2010, citing Chinese government efforts to limit free speech and block websites

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Google’s reported plan to launch a censored version of its search engine in China has come under heavy criticism from a former Asia-Pacific head of the company’s free expression issues who called it a “stupid move”.

“This is just a really bad idea, a stupid, stupid move. I feel compelled to speak out and say that this is not right,” The Intercept quoted Lokman Tsui as saying on Friday.

Tsui was Google’s head of free expression for Asia and the Pacific between 2011 and 2014.

The news about Google’s plan to build a censored search engine broke last week.

Codenamed “Dragonfly”, the search platform would blacklist “sensitive queries” about topics including politics, free speech, democracy, human rights and peaceful protest, according to a previous report by The Intercept.

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Google is yet to officially confirm or deny the search engine project. Pixabay

“I can’t see a way to operate Google search in China without violating widely held international human rights standards,” the report quoted Tsui as saying.

Google is yet to officially confirm or deny the search engine project.

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Tsui said that if Google goes ahead with the censored search engine project, it would go against its publicly stated ethos.

The tech giant had launched a search engine in China in 2006, but pulled the service out of the country in 2010, citing Chinese government efforts to limit free speech and block websites. (IANS)

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