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Child Protection Schemes To Be Included In NCERT Books

NCERT books would now be containing child protection schemes in them.

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Child protection schemes like the POCSO Act and 24×7 children helpline numbers are now being published on the inside of the front cover of all the course books from class 6-12, according to Women and Child Development (WCD) Ministry.

Published by the National Council Of Educational Research And Training (NCERT), the step is taken to equip the children with the information regarding the possible modes of protection and complaints.

In 2017, the WCD Minister Maneka Gandhi had requested Ministry of Human Resource Development (HRD) Minister Prakash Javadekar and NCERT to popularise POCSO e-Box and Childline 1098 through NCERT publications, screening of educational films on child sexual abuse in the schools and having strict norms for employing the support staff.

Children must live in a safe environment.
Children need to seek protection.

After the step was taken, Gandhi thanked Javadekar and NCERT for implementing her suggestion. She added that the parents, guardians, and teachers should remain vigilant about the children as well as their behaviour and any suspected situation should be reported immediately on the Childline No 1098 and the POCSO e-Box.

Also Read: Rampant Sexual Harassment of Children & Women in Islam

According to the WCD ministry, through these course books, the information is expected to reach approximately 26 crores school students and more than 10 lakh teachers in around 15 lakh schools. IANS

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A Majority of Children Die Due to Lack of Basic Healthcare Facilities: UN

For children everywhere, the most precarious time is the first month of life

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Children
A malnourished child lies in a bed waiting to receive treatment at a therapeutic feeding center in a hospital in Sana'a, Yemen, Jan. 24, 2016. (VOA)

An estimated 6.3 million children died before their 15th birthdays in 2017, or one every five seconds, mostly due to a lack of water, sanitation, nutrition and basic healthcare, according to report by United Nations agencies on Tuesday.

The vast majority of these deaths – 5.4 million – occur in the first five years of life, with newborns accounting for around half of the deaths, the report said.

“With simple solutions like medicines, clean water, electricity and vaccines” this toll could be dramatically reduced, said Laurence Chandy, an expert with the U.N. children’s fund UNICEF. But without urgent action, 56 million children under five – half of them newborns – will die between now and 2030.

Globally, in 2017, half of all deaths in children under five were in sub-Saharan Africa, where one in 13 children died before their fifth birthday. In high-income countries, that number was one in 185, according to the report co-led by UNICEF, the World Health Organization and the World Bank.

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UN: A Child Dies Every Five Seconds, Most Are Preventable Deaths. Pixabay

It found that most children under five die due to preventable or treatable causes such as complications during birth, pneumonia, diarrhoea, neonatal sepsis and malaria. Among older children – aged five to 14 – injuries become a more prominent cause of death, especially from drowning and road traffic.

For children everywhere, the most precarious time is the first month of life. In 2017, 2.5 million newborns died in their first month, and a baby born in sub-Saharan Africa or in Southern Asia was nine times more likely to die in the first month than one born in a high-income country.

Also Read- NASA Celebrates Its 60th Anniversary

Despite these problems, the U.N. report found that fewer children are dying each year worldwide. The number of under five deaths fell to 5.4 million in 2017 from 12.6 million in 1990, while the number of deaths in five to 14 year-olds dropped to under a million from 1.7 million in the same period. (VOA)

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