Wednesday July 18, 2018
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Child Protection Schemes To Be Included In NCERT Books

NCERT books would now be containing child protection schemes in them.

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Child protection schemes like the POCSO Act and 24×7 children helpline numbers are now being published on the inside of the front cover of all the course books from class 6-12, according to Women and Child Development (WCD) Ministry.

Published by the National Council Of Educational Research And Training (NCERT), the step is taken to equip the children with the information regarding the possible modes of protection and complaints.

In 2017, the WCD Minister Maneka Gandhi had requested Ministry of Human Resource Development (HRD) Minister Prakash Javadekar and NCERT to popularise POCSO e-Box and Childline 1098 through NCERT publications, screening of educational films on child sexual abuse in the schools and having strict norms for employing the support staff.

Children must live in a safe environment.
Children need to seek protection.

After the step was taken, Gandhi thanked Javadekar and NCERT for implementing her suggestion. She added that the parents, guardians, and teachers should remain vigilant about the children as well as their behaviour and any suspected situation should be reported immediately on the Childline No 1098 and the POCSO e-Box.

Also Read: Rampant Sexual Harassment of Children & Women in Islam

According to the WCD ministry, through these course books, the information is expected to reach approximately 26 crores school students and more than 10 lakh teachers in around 15 lakh schools. IANS

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Piano Lessons Make Children Smarter, Claims New Study

However it did not appear to confer any benefit for overall cognitive ability, as measured by IQ, attention span, and working memory, the researchers said

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Piano lessons make children smarter, claims new study
Piano lessons make children smarter, claims new study. Pixabay

If your kid is slow in language skills, then sending him or her for piano lessons can improve word discrimination as well as language proficiency, says a study.

The findings suggested that piano lessons may have specific effect on the children’s ability to distinguish different pitches, which helped them to better distinguish different words.

However it did not appear to confer any benefit for overall cognitive ability, as measured by IQ, attention span, and working memory, the researchers said.

“The children didn’t differ in the more broad cognitive measures, but they did show some improvements in word discrimination, particularly for consonants. The piano group showed the best improvement there,” said Robert Desimone from The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

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The study, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, included data from nearly 100 children aged four or five years, who were divided into three groups — one that received 45-minute piano lessons three times a week; one that received extra reading instruction for the same period of time; and one that received neither intervention.

After six months, the researchers tested the children on their ability to discriminate words based on differences in vowels, consonants, or tone.

The results showed that, children who had piano lessons showed a significant advantage over children in the extra reading group in discriminating between words that differ by one consonant.

Also Read: every Day In Madhya Pradesh 61 Children Die, official data Shows

Children in both the piano group and extra reading group performed better than children who received neither intervention when it came to discriminating words based on vowel differences.

“That’s a big thing for kids in learning language: being able to hear the differences between words. They really did benefit from that,” Desimone added.

The researchers hope their findings could encourage other schools to keep or enhance their music offerings. (IANS)

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