Wednesday April 8, 2020

Children Who Feel Connected To Nature Are More Likely To Be Happier, Reveals Study

For the findings, the research team recruited 296 children between the ages of 9 and 12 from a northwestern Mexican city

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The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, showed that connectedness to nature makes children happier due to their tendency to perform sustainable and pro-ecological behaviours. Pixabay

Dear parents, please take note. Researchers have found that children who feel connected to nature are also more likely to be happier.

The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology, showed that connectedness to nature makes children happier due to their tendency to perform sustainable and pro-ecological behaviours.

“Parents and teachers should promote children to have more significant contact or exposure to nature, because our results indicate that exposure to nature is related to the connection with it, and in turn, with sustainable behaviours and happiness,” said study researcher Laura Berrera-Hernandez from Sonora Institute of Technology in Mexico.

The researchers stated that a disconnection to nature, termed ‘nature deficit disorder’, may contribute to the destruction of the planet, as the lack of a bond with the natural world is unlikely to result in desire to protect it.

For the findings, the research team recruited 296 children between the ages of 9 and 12 from a northwestern Mexican city.

All the participants were given a self-administered scale completed in school to measure their connectedness to nature, sustainable behaviours (pro-ecological behaviour, frugality, altruism, and equity) and happiness.

This included measuring their agreement with statements about their connectedness to nature, such as ‘Humans are part of the natural world’ and statements about their sustainable behaviours, such as ‘I separate empty bottles to recycle’.

The researchers found that in children, feeling connected to nature had positive associations for sustainability practices and behaviours, and also led to children reporting higher levels of perceived happiness.

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Researchers have found that children who feel connected to nature are also more likely to be happier. Pixabay

This suggests that children who perceive themselves to be more connected to nature tend to perform more sustainable behaviours and therefore also have greater levels of happiness.

Previous research on adults had suggested a relationship between connectedness to nature and the development of pro-environmental behaviours, and the happiness derived from these.

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Despite the study’s limitations of only testing children from the same city, the results provided insight into the power of positive psychology of sustainability in children. (IANS)

 

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Consistent Bedtime Routine Reduces Risk of Obesity in Children

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Following a consistent bedtime routine may help reduce children's risk of becoming overweight or obese. Pixabay

Dear parents, kindly take note. Researchers have found that going to bed early and following a consistent bedtime routine may help reduce children’s risk of becoming overweight or obese.

“While we know it can be hard to get children to bed early, and at consistent times both on weekdays and at weekends, it might help parents or carers to know that establishing consistent and early bedtime may reduce the risk that their child will be overweight or obese,” said study lead author Yaqoot Fatima from the University of Queensland and James Cook University in Australia.

For the findings, published in the journal Acta Paediatrica, the research team wanted to explore sleep patterns in indigenous Australian children and assess the role of sleep timing in longitudinal changes in body mass index (BMI).In the study of 1,258 Indigenous Australian children were picked with an average age of 6 years.

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The findings highlight the importance of looking beyond sleep duration and highlighting the benefits of early bedtime for children. Pixabay

Latent profile analysis was conducted with the Australian Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children (LSIC) cohort data, to determine distinct patterns of bed and wake timing, taking account of weekday sleep duration, weekday and weekend bedtimes, and weekday wake times.

Multilevel models with a random intercept were used to investigate the role of baseline sleep pattern in predicting longitudinal changes in BMI.

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The researchers found that children who consistently went to bed late experienced greater weight gain over several years than those who went to bed early.

Also Read- Know How Smoking Cigarettes at a Young Age Can be Harmful

The findings highlight the importance of looking beyond sleep duration and highlighting the benefits of early bedtimes for children.

“As sleep timing is modifiable, this offers the opportunity for improvement in sleep and protecting against future weight gain in indigenous children,” the researchers noted. (IANS)