Monday October 21, 2019

Children of Less-educated Mothers Face Higher Risk of Obesity: Study

Kids of less-educated moms at higher obesity risk

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Obese? Blame it on Fat Cells' Expansion
Obese? Blame it on Fat Cells' Expansion. VOA

Children of poorly-educated mothers face higher risk of obesity than those whose mothers are well-educated, suggests a new study.

For the study, published in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology journal, the researchers analysed data of 41,399 children in three European countries — Ireland, Portugal and the UK — using the mother’s highest level of education as a marker of socio-economic position.

The researchers from Trinity College, Ireland observed that children from poor socio-economic backgrounds or primary-educated backgrounds were more likely to be overweight or obese at any age as compared to children whose mothers’ had a tertiary-level education.

In Ireland, boys and girls aged 13 whose mothers had a primary-level education measured heavier as compared to children from tertiary-level (university-level) backgrounds, the study found.

obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

“This study shows that children from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds gain body mass more quickly than their more advantaged peers, are more likely to be overweight or obese from pre-school age onwards, and are more likely to become obese if previously non-overweight. They are quite literally carrying a heavier burden of disease from much earlier in life,” said lead author Cathal McCrory, Research Assistant Professor at Trinity College.

“These findings reinforce the necessity of challenging the childhood obesity epidemic at early ages as these patterns are difficult to change once they have become entrenched,” McCrory added.

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The study showed while there were no differences in Body Mass Index (BMI) between children grouped by their mothers’ education in infancy, differences in BMI emerged by pre-school age (3-5 years).

“This research shows that inequalities in health and life expectancy start early in life and are well established by age five. Most children who are obese have a higher risk of being obese in adulthood with long-term health consequences,” said Richard Layte, Professor of Sociology at the varsity. (IANS)

Next Story

Fatty Tissues Accumulate Inside Lungs of Obese People: Study

The researchers examined post-mortem samples of the lungs that had been donated for the research and stored in the Airway Tissue Biobank

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Obese
Excess fat accumulates in the airway walls of Obese people where it takes up space and seems to increase inflammation within the lungs. Pixabay

Researchers have found that fatty tissues accumulate in the airway walls, particularly in people who are overweight or obese.

The study, published in the European Respiratory Journal, suggested that the fatty tissue alters the structure of people’s airways and this could be one reason behind the increased risk of asthma.

“Our research team studies the structure of the airways within our lungs and how these are altered in people with respiratory disease,” said the study’s author John Elliot from Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Australia.

“Looking at the samples of lungs, we spotted fatty tissue that had built up in the airway walls. We wanted to see if this accumulation was correlated with body weight,” Elliot said.

The researchers examined post-mortem samples of the lungs that had been donated for the research and stored in the Airway Tissue Biobank.

They studied samples from 52 people, including 15 who had no asthma, 21 who had the disease but died of other causes and 16 who died of asthma.

Using dyes to help visualise the structures of 1373 airways under a microscope, they identified and quantified any fatty tissue present.

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Fatty tissue alters the structure of Obese people’s airways and this could be one reason behind the increased risk of asthma. Pixabay

They compared this data with each person’s body mass index (BMI).

The study showed that fatty tissue accumulates in the walls of the airways. The analysis revealed that the amount of fat present increases in line with increasing BMI.

“We’ve found that excess fat accumulates in the airway walls where it takes up space and seems to increase inflammation within the lungs,” said the study’s co-author Peter Noble.

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“We think this is causing a thickening of the airways that limits the flow of air in and out of the lungs, and that could at least partly explain an increase in asthma symptoms,” Noble said. (IANS)