Wednesday January 29, 2020

Children of Less-educated Mothers Face Higher Risk of Obesity: Study

Kids of less-educated moms at higher obesity risk

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Obese? Blame it on Fat Cells' Expansion
Obesity may alter 70% routine blood tests in kids: Study. VOA

Children of poorly-educated mothers face higher risk of obesity than those whose mothers are well-educated, suggests a new study.

For the study, published in Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology journal, the researchers analysed data of 41,399 children in three European countries — Ireland, Portugal and the UK — using the mother’s highest level of education as a marker of socio-economic position.

The researchers from Trinity College, Ireland observed that children from poor socio-economic backgrounds or primary-educated backgrounds were more likely to be overweight or obese at any age as compared to children whose mothers’ had a tertiary-level education.

In Ireland, boys and girls aged 13 whose mothers had a primary-level education measured heavier as compared to children from tertiary-level (university-level) backgrounds, the study found.

obese children
India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay

“This study shows that children from disadvantaged socio-economic backgrounds gain body mass more quickly than their more advantaged peers, are more likely to be overweight or obese from pre-school age onwards, and are more likely to become obese if previously non-overweight. They are quite literally carrying a heavier burden of disease from much earlier in life,” said lead author Cathal McCrory, Research Assistant Professor at Trinity College.

“These findings reinforce the necessity of challenging the childhood obesity epidemic at early ages as these patterns are difficult to change once they have become entrenched,” McCrory added.

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The study showed while there were no differences in Body Mass Index (BMI) between children grouped by their mothers’ education in infancy, differences in BMI emerged by pre-school age (3-5 years).

“This research shows that inequalities in health and life expectancy start early in life and are well established by age five. Most children who are obese have a higher risk of being obese in adulthood with long-term health consequences,” said Richard Layte, Professor of Sociology at the varsity. (IANS)

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Bariatric Surgery may Help Resolve Respiratory Issues

Weight loss surgery may improve breathing issues

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Respiratory
Researchers have revealed that Bariatric surgery and weight loss appear to reverse some of the negative effects of obesity on the respiratory system. Pixabay

Researchers have revealed that Bariatric surgery and weight loss appear to reverse some of the negative effects of obesity on the respiratory system.

Known effects of obesity on the respiratory system include increased respiratory work, along with compromised airway resistance and respiratory muscle strength, which may all contribute to restrictive pulmonary function impairment.

As an imaging technology that provides detailed pictures of the lungs and airways, CT has great potential to improve understanding of obesity’s impact on the respiratory system.

Until now, however, there have been few CT studies evaluating obesity’s effects on the lungs and the trachea, often referred to as the windpipe.

“For the first time, this study has demonstrated changes in the CT morphology of large and small airways that improve when individuals lose weight. These features correlate with an improvement in patient symptoms,” said study lead author Susan J. Copley from Hammersmith Hospital in London.

Respiratory  weight loss
Known effects of obesity on the respiratory system include increased respiratory work. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Radiology, the research team evaluated changes in the respiratory systems of 51 obese individuals who underwent Bariatric surgery, a treatment for obese patients who haven’t responded to other weight loss approaches.

The procedure reduces the size of the stomach. All participants lost weight post-surgery with a mean body mass index decrease of 10.5 kg/m2.

The researchers used CT to measure the size and shape of the trachea and assessed air trapping, a phenomenon in which excess air remains in the lungs after exhaling, resulting in a reduction in lung function.

Air trapping is an indirect sign of obstruction in the small airways of the lung.

When the researchers compared results at baseline and six months after Bariatric surgery, they found that surgery and weight loss were associated with morphological, or structural, changes to the lung and trachea.

Also Read- Drinking Alcohol During Pregnancy Proved to be Harmful: Study

The results suggest that there may be a reversible element of small airway inflammation related to obesity and that reversal of this inflammation correlates with improvement in symptoms. The findings also point to CT as a potential marker of this inflammation.

“CT is a useful morphological marker to demonstrate subtle changes which are not easily assessed by lung function alone,” Copley said. (IANS)