Sunday December 8, 2019

Children of Mothers Suffering Domestic Violence are 50% More Likely to Have Lower IQ

We also know intelligence in childhood is strongly linked with doing well in adulthood, though there has been little evidence about the risk of low IQ for these children

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Domestic Violence
Women who experience Domestic Violence in their lifetime have their children at greater risk of physical, social and behavioural problems. Pixabay

Children of women who reported Domestic Violence during pregnancy or the first six years of the child’s life are almost 50 per cent more likely to have low IQ (intelligence quotient), researchers have found.

The study, published in the journal Wellcome Open Research, revealed that only 13 per cent children whose mothers didn’t experience domestic violence had IQ below 90 at 8 years of age.

Low IQ is defined as an IQ score less than 90. Normal IQ is considered to be 100.

If mothers experienced physical violence from partners either in pregnancy or during the first six years of the child’s life, the figure rises to 22.8 per cent, according to the researchers from the University of Manchester, the UK.

The study examined the link between domestic violence — also called intimate partner violence (IPV) — and child intelligence at 8 years, using 3,997 mother-child pairs from The University of Bristol’s Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

“We know one in four women aged 16 and over in England and Wales will experience domestic violence in their lifetime and that their children are at greater risk of physical, social and behavioural problems,” said lead author of the study Kathryn Abel from University of Manchester.

“We also know intelligence in childhood is strongly linked with doing well in adulthood, though there has been little evidence about the risk of low IQ for these children,” Abel said.

“While we can’t conclude that IPV causes low IQ, these findings demonstrate domestic violence has a measurable link, by mid-childhood, independent of other risk factors for low IQ,” Abel said.

Domestic Violence
Children of women who reported Domestic Violence during pregnancy or the first six years of the child’s life are almost 50 per cent more likely to have low IQ (intelligence quotient), researchers have found. Pixabay

The study follows children from pregnancy, and measures emotional and physical domestic violence from pregnancy until eight years of age. The intelligence of the children was measured at eight years using the Weschler Standardised IQ test.

This study shows the chance of a low IQ rises to 34.6 per cent if the mother was repeatedly exposed to domestic violence.

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That means children with mothers who repeatedly suffer domestic violence during pregnancy and the first six years of their child’s life are almost three times more likely to have a low IQ at 8 years of age, researchers found.

According to the researchers, 17.6 per cent of the mothers in the study reported emotional violence and 6.8 per cent reported physical violence. (IANS)

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Females Suffering Domestic Abuse More Prone to Long-Term illness: Study

The study, examined the general practitioner (GP) records dating between 1995 and 2017 of 18,547 women who had suffered domestic abuse

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Domestic Abuse
According to the study, survivors of Domestic Abuse can experience immense physiological and psychological stress. Pixabay

Female survivors of Domestic Abuse are at double the risk of developing long-term illnesses that cause widespread bodily pain and extreme tiredness, a new study suggests.

Published in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence, the research from Universities of Birmingham and Warwick in the UK shows that women who have experienced domestic abuse are almost twice as likely to develop fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) than those who have not.

Fibromyalgia causes pain all over the body, while CFS is an illness with a wide range of symptoms, most common of which is extreme tiredness. They are both long-term conditions.

“We have been aware that domestic abuse has significant negative effects for victims and their children. This and other related work by our team showing strong associations with several diseases suggests that the costs of abuse are even greater than understood previously,” said Indian-origin researcher and study co-author Siddhartha Bandyopadhyay from the University of Birmingham.

“The higher incidence of long-term illnesses, such as chronic fatigue syndrome, for abused women implies the existence of an additional hidden cost to society that we need to understand better,” Bandyopadhyay added.

The study, examined the general practitioner (GP) records dating between 1995 and 2017 of 18,547 women who had suffered domestic abuse, compared to 74,188 who had not.

They found the risk of developing fibromyalgia and CFS in women who have experienced domestic abuse was twice the rate of those who had no recorded experience by their GP, after taking into account factors which may influence the association.

The incidence rate ratio for developing fibromyalgia was 1.73 (1.36-2.22). The incidence rate ratio of developing CFS was 1.91 (1.11-3.33)

Domestic Abuse
Female survivors of Domestic Abuse are at double the risk of developing long-term illnesses that cause widespread bodily pain and extreme tiredness, a new study suggests. Pixabay

It comes after a previous study led by the University of Birmingham showed that UK domestic abuse victims are three times more likely to develop severe mental illnesses.

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“Considering the prevalence of domestic abuse, and the fact that patients experiencing fibromyalgia and CFS often face delays in diagnosis due to a limited understanding generally of how these conditions are caused, it is important for clinicians to bear in mind that women who have survived abuse are at a greater risk of these conditions,” Chandan added.

According to the study, survivors of Domestic Abuse can experience immense physiological and psychological stress. (IANS)