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China’s First Female Pilot of J-10 Fighter Jets dies in an Accident

Yu was the first of four women who are certified to fly the J-10, a single-engine multi-role jet that entered service in 2004

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Beijing, November 14, 2016: One of China’s first female fighter pilots and a member of the country’s air force aerobatics team was killed in a training accident over the weekend, according to Chinese state-run media.

Captain Yu Xu, 30, died on Saturday during a routine training flight with the aerobatics team, CNN cited the reports as saying.

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The Chinese military did not provide details of the accident in Hebei province, but state-run media, citing military sources and witnesses said Yu ejected from her aircraft after it collided with another during the training.

After the ejection, the wing of another plane hit Yu which left her dead, the report said.

Yu’s male co-pilot ejected safely and survived, the report said. The other jet also landed safety.

The flight data recorder, or black box, from Yu’s jet was recovered as authorities investigate the accident.

Yu was the first of four women who are certified to fly the J-10, a single-engine multi-role jet that entered service in 2004 and is considered the first Chinese domestic fighter to rival Western fighters in its capabilities.

Yu flew a J-10 fighter with China’s August 1st Aerobatics Team. Her last performance was at Airshow China in Zhuhai earlier this month.

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J-10 fighters from China’s August 1st aerobatics team performed at Airshow China in Zhuhai on November 4. The show was Yu Xu’s last public performance.

“I think the acrobatics are quite difficult, with high requirements and standards made in all aspects. Our condition is quite satisfactory, but we need more training if we want to be better,” Yu had said of her performances.

“I’m quite happy with myself, because this solo flight means that I have become a real fighter pilot,” she said.

Wan Ying, a friend of Yu’s, told CNN that Yu was “a very positive, humble and nice person who loved taking care of friends”.

Yu’s death on Saturday saw many in China questioning in online forums whether women should be fighter pilots and if they were getting the right training.

“I only want to know the cause of the incident. What should be to blame for, problems with the plane or lack of training,” one poster wrote on the Chinese social website Weibo.

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Chinese aviation expert Wang Ya’nan said Yu and other women in the Peoples Liberation Army Air Force were trail blazers.

“China is a pioneer in training female aerobatic pilots. When the programme started, there was no foreign experience to borrow from or statistics to rely on from other countries. From this perspective, Yu Xu and other female aerobatic pilots have taken greater risks, which deserve more of our respect,” Wang said. (IANS)

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  • Ruchika Kumari

    A big salute to Yu….May her soul rest in peace

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Aadhaar Helpline Mystery: French Security Expert Tweets of doing a Full Disclosure Tomorrow about Code of the Google SetUP Wizard App

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Pichai met with senior Republicans on Friday to discuss their concerns, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said. Wikimedia Commons

Google’s admission that it had in 2014 inadvertently coded the 112 distress number and the UIDAI helpline number into its setup wizard for Android devices triggered another controversy on Saturday as India’s telecom regulator had only recommended the use of 112 as an emergency number in April 2015.

After a large section of smartphone users in India saw a toll-free helpline number of UIDAI saved in their phone-books by default, Google issued a statement, saying its “internal review revealed that in 2014, the then UIDAI helpline number and the 112 distress helpline number were inadvertently coded into the SetUp wizard of the Android release given to OEMs for use in India and has remained there since”.

Aadhaar Helpline Number Mystery: French security expert tweets of doing a full disclosure tomorrow about Code of the Google SetUP Wizard App, Image: Wikimedia Commons.

However, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) recommended only in April 2015 that the number 112 be adopted as the single emergency number for the country.

According to Google, “since the numbers get listed on a user’s contact list, these get  transferred accordingly to the contacts on any new device”.

Google was yet to comment on the new development.

Meanwhile, French security expert that goes by the name of Elliot Alderson and has been at the core of the entire Aadhaar controversy, tweeted on Saturday: “I just found something interesting. I will probably do full disclosure tomorrow”.

“I’m digging into the code of the @Google SetupWizard app and I found that”.

“As far as I can see this object is not used in the current code, so there is no implications. This is just a poor coding practice in term of security,” he further tweeted.

On Friday, both the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) as well as the telecom operators washed their hand of the issue.

While the telecom industry denied any role in the strange incident, the UIDAI said that he strange incident, the UIDAI said that some vested interests were trying to create “unwarranted confusion” in the public and clarified that it had not asked any manufacturer or telecom service provider to provide any such facility.

Twitter was abuzz with the new development after a huge uproar due to Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (TRAI) Chairman R.S. Sharma’s open Aadhaar challenge to critics and hackers.

Ethical hackers exposed at least 14 personal details of the TRAI Chairman, including mobile numbers, home address, date of birth, PAN number and voter ID among others. (IANS)

Also Read: Why India Is Still Nowhere Near Securing Its Citizens’ Data?