Tuesday September 25, 2018
Home Lead Story Chinese Tarif...

Chinese Tariffs Affecting Price of Soybeans in the US

Added into the mix are new concerns that buyers in China, the world’s top consumer of soybeans, have stopped purchasing supplies from the U.S., even before tariffs are in place.

0
//
30
Farmer Scott Halpin is facing another year of high prices for seed and fertilizer, and low prices for the corn and soybeans his family is planting on farmland outside Morris, Illinois.
Soybeans prices affected due to Chinese Tariffs, Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

By Ajay Kumar

Farmer Scott Halpin is facing another year of high prices for seed and fertilizer, and low prices for the corn and soybeans his family is planting on farmland outside Morris, Illinois.

“Equipment is expensive,” he told VOA while taking a break from loading seed into the John Deere planter that will eventually place them in the soil. “Land is expensive. It costs a lot of money to put a crop in the ground.”

As U.S. farmers head to their fields to plant this year’s crop, they face new challenges created by Chinese threats to impose tariffs on some of their products, a retaliatory move in the wake of pending U.S. tariffs on Chinese aluminum and steel.

It’s the latest salvo in an escalating trade dispute that has farmers warily watching fluctuating commodity prices as the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) projects net farm income in 2018 to reach a 12-year low.

Any potential Chinese tariffs could impact the price of soybeans and ultimately Halpin’s bottom line.

“Soybeans make up just under half of our crop rotation,” Halpin said. “It’s a real important part of our farm operation here.”

Markel’s Personality: Hometown Celebrates Markle’s Sparkling Personality

Added into the mix are new concerns that buyers in China, the world’s top consumer of soybeans, have stopped purchasing supplies from the U.S., even before tariffs are in place.

For Halpin, the bad news seems relentless.

“It can hurt when things happen on a daily basis. It’s just kind of uncertain times here in farming,” he said. (VOA)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2018 NewsGram

Next Story

Living Fossil in Illinois Waterways: Disappeared from 1990’s Water, Fish “Alligator Gar” is back in US Rivers

0
Illinois' Powerton Lake was stocked with alligator gar in 2011, to re-establish a population and offer a challenge to sport fishermen. VOA
  • The Alligator gar is considered to be the second largest freshwater fish in North America
  • The origin of the fish dates back to Early Cretaceous period, over a 100 million years ago
  • Biologist Randy Sauer believes that with the return of the Alligator gar in Illinois waterways, post a long disappearance since the 1990s, will restore the ecosystem

The Illinois Department of Natural Resources is reintroducing a living fossil into its waterways. The alligator gar is a fish so old, it’s thought to have evolved during the Early Cretaceous period, more than a 100 million years ago.

Alligator gar are the second largest freshwater fish in North America. Illinois fisheries biologist Randy Sauer says they disappeared from the state’s waterways in the 1990s, although they continued to thrive in southern U.S. rivers.

“We want to restore the ecosystem because it is important to have top predators to balance the species below them in order to keep a check on some more abundant species,” he said.

“It was pretty much extirpated out of its range because of misconceptions about it eating sport fish,” he said. “People would target it and put bounties on it.”

Everything is on the menu

The alligator gar is an opportunistic feeder, meaning it will eat whatever it encounters — from an occasional turtle or small duck to invasive species such as Asian and silver carp. Sauer hopes the re-introduction program will help the state’s efforts to control the carp.

Alligator gar fingerlings about to be released into an Illinois river.

Because gar can live up to 60 years, this program is going to take decades to fully expand.

“The (female) alligator gar does not sexually mature until 11 years, and the male not till 6 or 7 years,” Sauer said, “so at the outset of this project we’re probably going to stock more heavily than 10 or 20 years down the road when hopefully these fish will find each other and start doing the job on their own.”

The transponders scientists use to track the released gars are just a little bigger than a grain of rice.

To date, 7,000 alligator gar fingerlings have been fitted with tiny transponder tags so that they can be tracked and then released into Illinois waterways. As it rains and floods, biologists expect some of the fish to follow the rivers all the way down to join other populations in Louisiana and Texas. (VOA)

Next Story