Tuesday December 11, 2018
Home India “Choice of ab...

“Choice of abstaining from work not available to lawyers,” remarks outgoing Chief Justice

“It is my firm belief that the temple of justice has to remain open for litigants to knock the doors at any time. The closure of the temple shakes the faith of the common man”

0
//
lawyers
Law and Order, Source: Pixabay
Republish
Reprint

Chennai, 17th Feb, 2017: Elevated to the Supreme Court, Sanjay Kishan Kaul: The outgoing Chief Justice of Madras High Court departed with some advice for his fellow lawyers. During his felicitation, he said in his farewell speech “It is my firm belief that the temple of justice has to remain open for litigants to knock the doors at any time. The closure of the temple shakes the faith of the common man.”

NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

Kaul, who assumed charge as Chief Justice of Madras high court on July 26, 2014 further addressed the audience saying that he had always urged the members of the Bar that the choice of abstaining from work was not available to advocates who were in a noble profession.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

Again, he added that, “Lawyers were the officers of the court who were meant to advance the cause of justice by pursuing cases of their clients.”
Requesting the senior lawyers and judges to nurture youngsters, Kaul thanked the Bench, the Bar and the people of Tamil Nadu for the love they had shown to him.

Follow NewsGram on Facebook

By Nikita Saraf of NewsGram; Twitter:- @niki_saraf

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

Australia Becomes World’s First Country To Pass Bill Accessing Encrypted Information

Tech giant Apple said in October that “it would be wrong to weaken security for millions of law-abiding customers in order to investigate the very few who pose a threat.”

0
Social Media, digital, Encryption
This photo taken March 22, 2018, shows apps for WhatsApp, Facebook, Instagram and other social networks on a smartphone. VOA

Security agencies will gain greater access to encrypted messages under new laws in Australia. The legislation will force technology companies such as Apple, Facebook and Google to disable encryption protections to allow investigators to track the communications of terrorists and other criminals. It is, however, a controversial measure.

Australian law enforcement officials say the growth of end-to-end encryption in applications such as Signal, Facebook’s WhatsApp and Apple’s iMessage hamper their efforts to track the activities of criminals and extremists.

End-to-end encryption is a code that allows a message to stay secret between the person who wrote it and the recipient.

Data Recovery, encryption
The website of the Telegram messaging app is seen on a computer’s screen in Moscow, Russia, Friday, April 13, 2018. A Russian court has ordered the blocking of a popular messaging app following a demand by authorities that it share encryption data with them. VOA

PM: Law urgently needed

But a new law passed Thursday in Australia compels technology companies, device manufacturers and service providers to build in features needed for police to crack those hitherto secret codes. However, businesses will not have to introduce these features if they are considered “systemic weaknesses,” which means they are likely to result in compromised security for other users.

The Australian legislation is the first of its kind anywhere.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said the new law was urgently needed because encoded messaging apps allowed “terrorists and organized criminals and … pedophile rings to do their evil work.”

Critics: Law goes too far

However, critics, including technology companies, human rights groups, and lawyers, believe the measure goes too far and gives investigators “unprecedented powers to access encrypted communications.”

Google, Australia, encryption
A smartphone and computer screen display the Google home page. Australia is one step closer to forcing tech firms to give police access to encrypted data. VOA

Francis Galbally, the chairman of the encryption provider Senetas, says the law will send Australia’s tech sector into reverse.

“We will lose some of the greatest mathematicians and scientists this country has produced, and I can tell you because I employ a lot of them, they are fabulous, they are well regarded, but the world will now regard them if they stay in this country as subject to the government making changes to what they are doing in order to spy on everybody,” he said.

Galbally also claims that his company could lose clients to competitors overseas because it cannot guarantee its products have not been compromised by Australian authorities.

Also Read: Australia Shows Promise In Treatment of Multiple Scelrosis

Tech giant Apple said in October that “it would be wrong to weaken security for millions of law-abiding customers in order to investigate the very few who pose a threat.”

The new law includes penalties for noncompliance. (VOA)