Friday April 19, 2019

Cut Down Chronic Inflammation Risk by Eating Yogurt

Relishing yogurt as an "appetizer" may help reduce chronic inflammation -- a key factor associated with bowel disease, arthritis and asthma as well as cardiometabolic diseases, finds a study.

0
//
Indian superstition and the 'could be' logic behind them
Curd provides calming effect to the body. Wikimedia

Relishing yogurt as an “appetizer” may help reduce chronic inflammation — a key factor associated with bowel disease, arthritis and asthma as well as cardiometabolic diseases, finds a study.

The findings showed that yogurt may help reduce inflammation by improving the integrity of the intestinal lining, thus preventing endotoxins — pro-inflammatory molecules produced by gut microbes — from crossing into the blood stream.

“Eating eight ounces of low-fat yogurt before a meal is a feasible strategy to improve post-meal metabolism and thus may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic diseases,” said Ruisong Pei, postdoctoral researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US.

For the new study, published in the Journal of Nutrition, the team enrolled 120 pre menopausal women, half obese and half non-obese. Half of the participants were assigned to eat 12 ounces of low-fat yogurt every day for nine weeks; a control group ate non-dairy pudding for nine weeks.

The participants were also involved in a high-calorie meal challenge at the beginning and end of their nine-week dietary intervention.

yogurt
representational image. pixabay

The challenge, meant to stress an individual’s metabolism, started with either a serving of yogurt or non-dairy pudding followed by a large high-fat, high-carb breakfast meal.

For both challenges, blood work showed that the yogurt “appetizer” helped improve some key biomarkers of endotoxin exposure and inflammation as participants digested the meal over the ensuing hours.

It also helped improve glucose metabolism in obese participants by speeding up the reduction of post-meal blood glucose levels.

Also Read: Study Shows That 3 Cups of Coffee or Tea Daily May Cut Risk of Stroke

The findings help expand the overall body of scientific knowledge about how foods impact inflammation, but “the goal is to identify the components and then get human evidence to support their mechanism of action in the body”, said Brad Bolling, Assistant Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

“Ultimately, we would like to see these components optimised in foods, particularly for medical situations where it’s important to inhibit inflammation through the diet. We think this is a promising approach.” (IANS)

Next Story

UN: Geneva Can Improve the Health of Citizens Using Digital Technology

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people's health

0
health, citizens, digital technology
FILE - A doctor uses a smartphone to take a photo of a child with facial deformity before surgery at the Vietnam Cuba hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam. VOA

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued its first guidelines on digital health intervention.

The U.N. agency said governments can improve the health of their citizens by using digital technology to make health systems more efficient and responsive to their patients. The United Nations said 51 percent of the world’s population has access to broadband internet service.

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health.

health
Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people’s health. Pixabay

She told VOA the technology enables people, even in the remotest settings, to leapfrog into the development of a more effective, inclusive health system. With the use of mobile phones, computers and laptops, she said it is possible to bypass the intervening stages many countries have had to go through.

“So, a health worker in Congo can directly start using a mobile phone if the government is able to provide one to the health worker and get away from filling 30 paper registers, which occupy about one-third of front-line health workers time,” she added.

New recommendations

The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems.

health
The new guidelines include 10 recommendations on how governments can use digital technology for maximum impact on their health systems. Pixabay

A WHO scientist specializing in digital innovations and research, Garrett Mehl, said the recommendations deal with issues such as birth notification.

ALSO READ: Diabetes During Pregnancy Spikes up the Risk in Kids Later

“Knowing that a baby has been born is critical to knowing how to provide vaccinations; knowing that the mother needs different post-natal care visits,” he said. “But without knowing that there was a birth that has happened, it is difficult to trigger those events in the health system.”

The guidelines also address privacy concerns.They have recommendations for ensuring that sensitive data, such as issues of sexual and reproductive health, are protected and not put at risk. (VOA)