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Climate change taking toll on marine resources: Scientist

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Kochi: Climate change is taking a toll on fishery resources, with the consequent ocean warming and the rise of the sea level posing multiple threats to the marine ecosystem, a leading marine scientist said here on Thursday.

“The scientific community has to take steps to develop adequate technologies to reduce carbon footprints and international collaboration is necessary to undertake advanced research to tackle the issues being faced by the marine ecosystem,” B. Madhusoodana Kurup, vice chancellor of Kerala University of Fisheries and Ocean Studies (KUFOS), said at the Indo-EU workshop on marine ecosystem and climate in India.

The workshop was jointly organised by KUFOS and the Nansen Environmental Research Centre-India (NERCI) under the EU-INDO-MARECLIM project of the European Union.

“Climate change has direct impact on ocean resources. The consequent rise of sea surface temperature and habitat destruction are causing the disappearance of commercially important fish species,” he said.

“There are scientific challenges for ecologists, economists, and other social scientists, in understanding how human actions affect ecosystems, the provision of ecosystem services, and the value of those services.

“An effective strategy should be designed to manage, monitor and provide incentives that reflect the social values of ecosystem services,” said Kurup.

N.R. Menon, coordinator of the INDO-MARECLIM project and co-Chairman of NERCI, said the objective of the workshop was to establish scientific cooperation of India and the EU member states in areas of monsoon studies, protection of marine ecosystem and coastal zone management.

“The meet is aimed at initiating a tie-up with Europe to undertake serious research in these areas,” said Menon.

The INDO-MARECLIM project envisages developing an institutional network in India to embark on joint research ventures from a case to case basis.

The project aims at facilitating and improving cooperation between the EU members states, associated countries and India.

(IANS)

 

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The Trump Administration Just Lost Another Court Battle To Kids

The activists, whose ages range from preteen to the early 20s, are seeking various environmental remedies. A trial is scheduled for Oct. 29 in the federal court in Eugene, Oregon

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FILE - The coal-fired Plant Scherer, one of the nation's top carbon dioxide emitters, stands in the distance in Juliette, Ga., June 3, 2017. The Trump administration intends to roll back the centerpiece of former President Barack Obama’s efforts to slow global warming, seeking to ease restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. Young activists are suing the government for ignoring climate change. VOA

A federal appeals court on Friday rejected the Trump administration’s renewed bid to dismiss a lawsuit by young activists who say it is ignoring the perils of climate change.

By a 3-0 vote, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco said the government fell short of the “high bar” needed to dismiss the Oregon case, originally brought in 2015 against the administration of President Barack Obama.

Twenty-one children and young adults accused federal officials and oil industry executives of violating their due process rights by knowing for decades that carbon pollution poisons the environment but doing nothing about it.

The government contended that letting the case proceed would be too burdensome, unconstitutionally pit the courts against the executive branch, and require improper “agency decision-making” by forcing officials to answer questions about climate change.

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Twenty-one children and young adults accused federal officials and oil industry executives of violating their due process rights by knowing for decades that carbon pollution poisons the environment but doing nothing about it. Pixabay

But the appeals court said the issues raised “are better addressed through the ordinary course of litigation.”

An earlier government bid to end the case failed in March.

The activists, whose ages range from preteen to the early 20s, are seeking various environmental remedies. A trial is scheduled for Oct. 29 in the federal court in Eugene, Oregon.

Also Read: FDA Approves Drug to Stop Some Malaria Relapses

Representatives of the U.S. Department of Justice did not immediately respond to requests for comment. A lawyer for the activists did not immediately respond to similar requests.

The case is U.S. et al v U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon, Eugene, 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. No. 18-71928. (VOA)

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