Saturday February 16, 2019

Consuming Cocoa May Improve Vitamin D Intake, Says Study

However, the researchers do not recommend consuming large quantities of chocolates

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cocoa
Eating cocoa may boost your Vitamin D intake: Study. Pixabay

Love chocolates or other products containing cocoa? A new study has found that foods rich in cocoa, such as cocoa butter, cocoa beans, cocoa powder, dark chocolates, may improve your vitamin D intake.

Vitamin D comes in two types — vitamin D2 and D3. While, vitamin D3 is produced in the human skin through exposure to the sun, the rest is ideally consumed through food such as fatty fish, chicken or eggs.

The findings, published in the journal Food Chemistry, revealed that products containing cocoa are indeed a source of vitamin D2. However, the amount varied greatly from food to food.

“This is not surprising as the cocoa content in white chocolate is significantly lower. It confirms our assumption that cocoa is the source of vitamin D2,” said co-author Gabriele Stangl, Professor from the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg in Germany.

The researchers said that brittle bones and an increased risk of respiratory diseases could be the result of a vitamin D deficiency and cocoa butter and dark chocolate have the highest amount of vitamin D2.

cocoa
A worker holds cocoa beans at SAF CACAO, a export firm in San-Pedro, Ivory Coast, Jan. 29, 2016. VOA

For the study, the research team investigated cocoa and cocoa products to ascertain whether or not it contained the important source of vitamin D.

Cocoa beans were dried after fermentation, placed on mats and exposed to the sun for one to two weeks.

While dark chocolate has a relatively high vitamin D2 content, very little amount of vitamin D was found in white chocolate, the researchers said.

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However, the researchers do not recommend consuming large quantities of chocolates.

“You would have to eat enormous amounts of chocolate to cover your vitamin D2 requirements. That would be extremely unhealthy because of the high sugar and fat content,” Stangl noted. (IANS)

Next Story

Vitamin D Helps Body Clear TB Bugs: Study

For the study, researchers included 1,850 patients who received antibiotic treatment.

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Vitamin D helps combat drug-resistant TB
Vitamin D pills can prevent TB disease. Pixabay

Vitamin D, commonly known as the “sunshine vitamin”, can combat tuberculosis (TB) bacteria found in the lungs of people with multi-drug resistant TB, according to latest research.

The study showed that when added to antibiotic treatment, vitamin D was found to treat TB specifically in patients with multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB.

The vitamin D supplementation was also found to be safe at the doses administered, with no links to serious adverse events, findings further revealed in the European Respiratory Journal.

Vitamin D plays an important role in preventing TB.
Vitamin D is best known for its effects on bone health. Pixabay

“Multi-drug resistant TB is on the rise globally. It’s notoriously difficult to treat, and it carries a much worse prognosis than standard TB,” said Lead Researcher Adrian Martineau, Professor from Queen Mary University of London.

“Our study raises the possibility that vitamin D — which is very safe and inexpensive — could benefit this hard-to-treat group of patients by taking a novel approach to their treatment,” said Martineau.

The immune system could be given a boost by adding vitamin D to antibiotic treatment to help the body clear TB bugs, rather than relying on antibiotics on their own to kill the bacteria directly, the study suggested.

Vitamin D acts as an antibiotic treatment.
Vitamin D boosts the immune system. Pixabay

While vitamin D is best known for its effects on bone health, previous studies have shown its role in protecting against colds, flu, asthma attacks, and that it can also protect chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients from deadly lung attacks.

MDR TB is caused by bacteria that are resistant to treatment with at least two of the most powerful first-line anti-TB drugs, causing around 500,000 cases and 150,000 deaths per year worldwide, the study noted.

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For the study, researchers included 1,850 patients who received antibiotic treatment. (IANS)