Tuesday December 10, 2019

Coffee Compounds May Inhibit Growth of Prostate Cancer

It also showed the growth reduction occurred in transplanted tumour cells, rather than in native tumour cells

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Coffee can have both positive and negative effects. We need to find out more about the mechanisms behind these findings before we can think about clinical applications. Pixabay

Besides being the perfect morning drink, coffee may also play a role in delaying prostate cancer, finds a study, which may pave the way for treating drug-resistant cancer.

Scientists from Kanazawa University in Japan have identified kahweol acetate and cafestol — hydrocarbon compounds naturally found in Arabica coffee — which may inhibit growth of prostate cancer.

The pilot study showed kahweol acetate and cafestol can inhibit growth in cells that are resistant to common anti-cancer drugs like Cabazitaxel.

“We found that kahweol acetate and cafestol inhibited growth of cancer cells in mice, but the combination seemed to work synergistically, leading to a significantly slower tumour growth than in untreated mice,” said lead author Hiroaki Iwamoto.

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The pilot study showed kahweol acetate and cafestol can inhibit growth in cells that are resistant to common anti-cancer drugs like Cabazitaxel. Pixabay

For the study, presented at the European Association of Urology Congress in Barcelona, the team tested six compounds, naturally found in coffee, on proliferation of human prostate cancers cells in vitro (i.e. in a petri-dish).

They found cells treated with kahweol acetate and cafestol grew more slowly than controls. They then tested these compounds on prostate cancer cells, transplanted to mice (16 mice).

“After 11 days, the untreated tumours had grown by around three and a half times the original volume (342 per cent), whereas tumours in the mice treated with both compounds had grown by just over one and a half (167 per cent) times the original size,” Iwamoto said.

It also showed the growth reduction occurred in transplanted tumour cells, rather than in native tumour cells.

 

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Although “these are promising findings, but they should not make people change their coffee consumption,” cautioned Professor Atsushi Mizokami from the varsity.

“Coffee can have both positive and negative effects. We need to find out more about the mechanisms behind these findings before we can think about clinical applications. But if we can confirm these results, we may have candidates to treat drug-resistant prostate cancer,” Mizokami noted. (IANS)

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Consumption of Coffee May Reduce MetS: Study

Drinking coffee may reduce heart disease risk

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Coffee has been proven to reduce MetS. Pixabay

Coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Mets), say researchers adding that MetS increases the risk of cardiovascular problems, including coronary heart disease and stroke.

According the study, Assistant Professor Giuseppe Grosso from the University of Catania, Italy, reviewed his own scientific research on the association between coffee consumption and MetS in Polish and Italian cohorts and explored the potential mechanistic perspectives behind the inverse association.

His research suggests that polyphenols contained in coffee may be involved in the inverse association, specifically phenolic acids and flavonoids.

He also reviewed research that suggests that moderate coffee consumption is associated with a reduction of CVD, cancer, all-cause mortality and type 2 diabetes.

For the findings, Associate Professor Estefania from Toledo University of Navarra, Spain, reviewed meta-analyses considering associations between coffee consumption and MetS and discussed work in a Mediterranean cohort.

Her research involved 22,000 people and specifically considered caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.

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Average consumption of coffee can reduce the risk of heart diseases by reducing MetS. Pixabay

The study concluded that moderate coffee consumption (one to four cups per day) was associated with reduced risk of MetS, whilst higher intakes were not.

This was reported for both regular and decaffeinated coffee.

The inverse association between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome was shown in both men and women, said the study.

Also Read- Women Affected The Most By Environmental Stress: Study

Meta-analyses also found that a moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may be associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome.

The study was presented at the 13th European Nutrition Conference organised by the Federation of European Nutrition Societies (FENS) in Dublin, Ireland. (IANS)