Wednesday April 24, 2019

Coffee Compounds May Inhibit Growth of Prostate Cancer

It also showed the growth reduction occurred in transplanted tumour cells, rather than in native tumour cells

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Coffee can have both positive and negative effects. We need to find out more about the mechanisms behind these findings before we can think about clinical applications. Pixabay

Besides being the perfect morning drink, coffee may also play a role in delaying prostate cancer, finds a study, which may pave the way for treating drug-resistant cancer.

Scientists from Kanazawa University in Japan have identified kahweol acetate and cafestol — hydrocarbon compounds naturally found in Arabica coffee — which may inhibit growth of prostate cancer.

The pilot study showed kahweol acetate and cafestol can inhibit growth in cells that are resistant to common anti-cancer drugs like Cabazitaxel.

“We found that kahweol acetate and cafestol inhibited growth of cancer cells in mice, but the combination seemed to work synergistically, leading to a significantly slower tumour growth than in untreated mice,” said lead author Hiroaki Iwamoto.

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The pilot study showed kahweol acetate and cafestol can inhibit growth in cells that are resistant to common anti-cancer drugs like Cabazitaxel. Pixabay

For the study, presented at the European Association of Urology Congress in Barcelona, the team tested six compounds, naturally found in coffee, on proliferation of human prostate cancers cells in vitro (i.e. in a petri-dish).

They found cells treated with kahweol acetate and cafestol grew more slowly than controls. They then tested these compounds on prostate cancer cells, transplanted to mice (16 mice).

“After 11 days, the untreated tumours had grown by around three and a half times the original volume (342 per cent), whereas tumours in the mice treated with both compounds had grown by just over one and a half (167 per cent) times the original size,” Iwamoto said.

It also showed the growth reduction occurred in transplanted tumour cells, rather than in native tumour cells.

 

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Although “these are promising findings, but they should not make people change their coffee consumption,” cautioned Professor Atsushi Mizokami from the varsity.

“Coffee can have both positive and negative effects. We need to find out more about the mechanisms behind these findings before we can think about clinical applications. But if we can confirm these results, we may have candidates to treat drug-resistant prostate cancer,” Mizokami noted. (IANS)

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Interesting Study! Something That Reminds Us Of Coffee Can Alert Our Minds

However, the study noted that the association between coffee and arousal is not as strong in less coffee-dominated cultures.

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"People often encounter coffee-related cues, or think about coffee without actually ingesting it," Maglio said. Pixabay

Finding it hard to concentrate? Just looking at something that reminds us of coffee can cause our minds to become more alert and attentive, according to a new study.

“Coffee is one of the most popular beverages and a lot is known about its physical effects,” said Sam Maglio, Associate Professor at the University of Toronto in Canada.

However, much less is known about its psychological meaning — in other words, how even seeing reminders of it can influence how we think, Maglio added.

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“Coffee is one of the most popular beverages and a lot is known about its physical effects,” said Sam Maglio, Associate Professor at the University of Toronto in Canada. Pixabay

The study, published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition, looks at an effect called priming, through which exposure to even subtle cues can influence our thoughts and behaviour.

“People often encounter coffee-related cues, or think about coffee without actually ingesting it,” Maglio said.

The team used a mix of participants from Western and Eastern cultures “to see if there was an association between coffee and arousal such that if we simply exposed people to coffee-related cues, their physiological arousal would increase, as it would if they had actually drank coffee,” he noted.

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The study, published in the journal Consciousness and Cognition, looks at an effect called priming, through which exposure to even subtle cues can influence our thoughts and behaviour. Pixabay

They found that participants exposed to coffee-related cues perceived time as shorter and thought in more concrete, precise terms.

“People who experience physiological arousal — again, in this case as the result of priming and not drinking coffee itself — see the world in more specific, detailed terms,” Maglio said. “This has a number of implications for how people process information and make judgements and decisions.”

Also Read: In Effort To Reduce Unplanned Pregnancies And Abortions, Some Conservative States Easing Access to Birth Control

However, the study noted that the association between coffee and arousal is not as strong in less coffee-dominated cultures.

Maglio said the research may be of interest in better understanding a range of consumer-related behaviours and for marketers in considering retail store locations. (IANS)