Wednesday June 26, 2019

Cold-Parenting Associated with Premature Ageing in Offspring

The research has found that early-life stress is associated with shorter telomeres

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Cold-Parenting, Premature, Ageing
The research has found that early-life stress is associated with shorter telomeres. Pixabay

Unsupportive parenting styles may have several negative health implications for children including premature ageing and higher disease risk later in life, says a study.

The research found that the telomeres — protective caps on the ends of the strands of DNA — of participants who considered their mothers’ parenting style as “cold” were on average 25 per cent smaller compared to those who reported having a mother whose parenting style they considered “warm”.

The research has found that early-life stress is associated with shorter telomeres, a measurable biomarker of accelerated cellular ageing and increased disease risk later in life.

“Telomeres have been called a genetic clock, but we now know that as early life stress increases, telomeres shorten and the risk of a host of diseases increases, as well as premature death,” said lead author of the study Raymond Knutsen, Associate Professor at Loma Linda University School of Public Health in the US.

Cold-Parenting, Premature, Ageing
Unsupportive parenting styles may have several negative health implications for children including premature ageing. Pixabay

“We know that each time a cell divides, the telomeres shorten, which shortens its lifespan,” Knutsen added.

Interestingly, mutations in genes maintaining telomeres cause a group of rare diseases resembling premature ageing.

“However, we know that some cells in the body produce an enzyme called telomerase, which can rebuild these telomeres,” Knutsen said.

The study, published in the journal Biological Psychology, used data from 200 participants.

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“The way someone is raised seems to tell a story that is intertwined with their genetics,” Knutsen said. (IANS)

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Researchers Find Molecular Link Between Oestrogen and Bone Ageing

In addition, Sema3A was found to promote the survival of osteocytes -- bone cells -- in these mice

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oestrogen therapy can increase working memory under stress
oestrogen therapy can increase working memory under stress. wikimedia commons

Researchers have found a new molecular link between oestrogen and bone ageing, which may eventually lead to new strategies to treat osteoporosis among post-menopausal women.

Osteoporosis is a condition in which bones become weak and prone to fractures.

Women over 50 are at a high risk of developing osteoporosis, which may be due to the loss of oestrogen that occurs after menopause.

“Over the last few decades, we’ve learned that oestrogen plays an important role in maintaining a functional bone matrix,” said Tomoki Nakashima from the Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) in Japan.

However, how oestrogen does this, was not fully understood, the researchers said.

bone loss
Decoded: How does oestrogen protect bones? Check it out here.

In the study, the researchers discovered a protein called Sema3A, which was found to maintain bone matrix — proteins and minerals in bone — suggesting a relationship between oestrogen and Sema3A.

Further, the researchers found that blood serum levels of the protein Sema3A decreased in pre-menopausal women as they get older and dropped even more once they reach menopause.

In the study done on mice, the ovaries of mice were removed but it was found that the loss of oestrogen did not prevent their bones from deteriorating.

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In addition, Sema3A was found to promote the survival of osteocytes — bone cells — in these mice.

“We believe that as women lose oestrogen with age and Sema3A levels drop, osteocytes begin to die and bone loses the ability to maintain its supportive structure,” Mikihito Hayashi from the varsity said. (IANS)