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Computer Brain Training Exercise May Reduce Risk of Dementia by 29%, says Study

A computer brain training exercise designed to improve the speed and accuracy of visual attention can help seniors reduce risk of dementia by nearly a third

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Computer Brain Training
Computer Brain Training may reduce risk of dementia. Pixabay.
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New York, Nov 18: A computer brain training exercise designed to improve the speed and accuracy of visual attention can help seniors reduce risk of dementia by nearly a third, suggest results of a 10-year study.

This exercise is known as “speed of processing training”, “useful field of view training”, or “UFOV training.

“Speed of processing computer brain training resulted in decreased risk of dementia across the 10-year period of, on average, 29 per cent as compared to the control,” said lead study author Jerri Edwards from University of South Florida in the US.

“When we examined the dose-response, we found that those who trained more received more protective benefit,” Edwards added.

The study, published in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Translational Research & Clinical Interventions, enrolled 2,802 healthy older adults in the US and followed them as they aged from an average of 74 to 84 years.

Participants were divided into a control group or one of three intervention arms using different types of cognitive training.

One group received instruction on memory strategies and another group received instruction on reasoning strategies. The third group received individualised computerised speed of processing training.

Researchers found no significant difference in risk of dementia for the strategy-based memory or reasoning training groups, as compared to the control group.

However, as compared to the control group, the computerised speed training group showed significantly less risk of dementia — averaging a 29 per cent risk reduction.

When reviewing the impact of each computerised speed training session completed, researchers found those who completed more sessions had lower risk.

The computerised speed training task or the computer brain training exercise was designed to improve the speed and accuracy of visual attention, including both divided and selective attention exercises.

The computer brain training exercise was developed by Karlene Ball of the University of Alabama Birmingham and Dan Roenker of Western Kentucky University – both in the US. (IANS)

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Regular Exercise Removes Toxic Proteins in Muscle Cells

After inducing sciatic nerve injury on the rats, the researchers prepared them for surgery

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Exercise may cut the risk of stroke in menopausal women. Pixabay

Regular exercise helps in removing toxic proteins in muscle cells that can lead to atrophy and muscle weakness, says a new study.

The study, published in the journal Scientific Reports, showed that the lack of muscle stimulus results in a build-up of inadequately processed proteins in muscle cells.

“Daily exercise sensitises the autophagic system, facilitating the elimination of proteins and organelles that aren’t functional in the muscles,” said one of the researchers, Julio Cesar Batista Ferreira, Assistant Professor at University of Sao Paulo in Brazil.

“Removal of these dysfunctional components is very important; when they accumulate, they become toxic and contribute to muscle cell impairment and death.”

Muscle weakness or wasting is a typical muscle dysfunction condition that affects the elderly or individuals suffering from sciatic nerve injury, something usually seen in bedridden patients or workers who spend long hours sitting.

Sciatic nerve injury is a painful injury from your lower back into the back or side or your legs.

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Representational image. Pixabay

The study was conducted on rats with induced sciatic nerve injury.

The pain sciatic nerve injury causes prevents an individual from using the affected leg, and eventually the muscles concerned weaken and atrophy.

After inducing sciatic nerve injury on the rats, the researchers prepared them for surgery.

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Before the surgical procedure, the rats were divided into two groups. One remained sedentary, and the other was given exercise training that consisted of running at 60 per cent of maximum aerobic capacity for an hour a day, five days a week.

After four weeks of exercise training, the surgery was performed, and the muscular dysfunction induced by sciatic nerve injury was found to be less aggressive in the aerobic exercise group than in the sedentary group. (IANS)