Monday December 16, 2019

Conflicts Between Mother and Daughter Spikes up Risk of Suicide In Teen Girls

Nearly 11.7 per cent of non-maltreated, depressed adolescents indicated suicidal ideation compared to 26.8 per cent of maltreated, depressed adolescents

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Mother-daughter conflict ups suicide risk in abused teen girls: Study. Pixabay

Teenage girls who were maltreated during their childhood are more likely to entertain suicidal thoughts if the relationship with their mother is poor and the degree of conflict between the two is high.

Maltreatment includes emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and emotional and physical neglect.

The findings of the study highlighted that the quality of the mother-daughter relationship and their level of conflict are two direct mechanisms that are associated with child maltreatment and suicidal thoughts during adolescence.

“Our findings suggest that disruptions to a positive mother-teen relationship are one reason why children who experienced abuse or neglect are at risk for suicide as teens,” said Elizabeth Handley, Assistant Professor University of Rochester in New York.

“We know from decades of research that a warm, nurturing, and consistent relationship between mothers and their children is critical for many aspects of healthy development. This continues to be true even in adolescence, when teenagers spend more time with their friends and less time at home with family,” she added.

For the study, published in the journal Suicide and Life Threatening Behaviour, researchers from the varsity included 164 socio-economically disadvantaged, depressed, adolescent girls (average 14-year-olds) and their mothers.

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Representational image. Pixabay

The team examined mother-daughter relationship quality, mother-daughter conflict, and adolescent depressive symptoms.

Among the study participants 51.8 per cent of adolescents indicated a history of at least one form of maltreatment.

They found that rates of suicidal thoughts and recurrent thoughts of death were higher among teenage girls with a history of maltreatment than those without such records.

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Nearly 11.7 per cent of non-maltreated, depressed adolescents indicated suicidal ideation compared to 26.8 per cent of maltreated, depressed adolescents.

Attachment-based family therapy has proven useful in reducing suicidal thoughts among teenagers by strengthening the functioning of the family and the parent-adolescent attachment relationship, the team noted. (IANS)

Next Story

New AI can Reduce Risk of Suicide Among Youth

AI can help prevent suicide among youth

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Researchers from USC developed an AI that can prevent suicide risks among youth. Lifetime Stock

In a bid to help mitigate the risk of suicide especially among the homeless youth, a team of researchers at University of California (USC) has turned their focus towards Artificial Intelligence (AI).

Phebe Vayanos, an associate director at USC’s Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society (CAIS), and her team have been working over the last couple of years to design an algorithm capable of identifying who in a given real-life social group would be the best persons to be trained as “gatekeepers” capable of identifying warning signs of suicide and how to respond.

“Our idea was to leverage real-life social network information to build a support network of strategically positioned individuals that can ‘watch-out’ for their friends and refer them to help as needed,” Vayanos said.

Vayanos and study’s lead author Aida Rahmattalabi investigated the potential of social connections such as friends, relatives and acquaintances to help mitigate the risk of suicide.

“We want to ensure that a maximum number of people are being watched out for, taking into account resource limitations and uncertainties of open world deployment,” Vayanos said.

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The AI algorithm can improve the efficiency of suicide prevention trainings. Lifetime Stock

For this study, Vayanos and Rahmattalabi looked at the web of social relationships of young people experiencing homelessness in Los Angeles, given that 1 in 2 youth who are homeless have considered suicide.

“Our algorithm can improve the efficiency of suicide prevention trainings for this particularly vulnerable population,” Vayanos said.

An important goal when deploying this AI system is to ensure fairness and transparency.

“This algorithm can help us find a subset of people in a social network that gives us the best chance that youth will be connected to someone who has been trained when dealing with resource constraints and other uncertainties,” said study co-author Anthony Fulginiti.

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This work is particularly important for vulnerable populations, say the researchers, particularly for youth who are experiencing homelessness.

The paper is set to be presented at the 33rd Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems (NeurIPS) in Vancouver, Canada, this month. (IANS)