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A panda nibbles on a bamboo shoot. Pixabay
  • The research noted that forests outside of reserves often grow faster than the ones inside the reserves
  • It was also discovered by the researchers that forests in the lower elevation zones which are not primarily meant for the habitat for pandas, are not being protected properly yet

Washington DC, July 02, 2017: Pandas are adorable creatures! Conserving these animals can also enrich biodiversity along with fighting climate changes, a new study has revealed.

According to the reports of ANI, the study leads to a course going beyond pandas to more beneficial ways of conservation.


Jianguo “Jack” Liu from the Michigan State University in East Lansing, US, stated “Sometimes unintended consequences can be happy ones – and give us ways to do even better as we work toward sustainability.” She further added, “Pandas are leading us to even greater ways to care for nature and health of humans and the planet,” ANI reported.

ALSO READ: With captive Giant Pandas living longer than ever, list of their physical and even Emotional needs is growing

Another researcher Andres Viña said, “Reserves are created thinking about the pandas – but we wanted to see if they provide more benefits than just the pandas.”

Liu and Viña discovered that due to the slow metabolism rate and the limited diet of these animals, bamboo is lacking in nutritional density, and pandas need large forests for their survival.

According to the reports, the forests which are inside the reserves and the ones in areas outside the borders of the reserves, provide complex canopy which include the leaves and branches, soaking up carbon dioxide- a greenhouse gas that heavily affects climate change.

The research noted that forests outside of reserves often grow faster than the ones inside the reserves. But according to Vina, that isn’t a downfall of reserves.

Viña further stated that it would be great to allow more space between the planted trees and include different varieties to grow as well for more robust forests, in future, ANI has reported.

It was also discovered by the researchers that forests in the lower elevation zones which are not primarily meant for the habitat for pandas, are not being protected properly yet. She stated “We are seeing efforts that are moving in the right direction and showing positive results for nature and for humans. Now it’s time to continue those efforts and fine tune them to continue to get even more benefits.”

Reportedly, the study has been published in journal Ecosphere.

– prepared by Antara Kumar of NewsGram. Twitter: @ElaanaC

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