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Conserving Pandas can Enrich Biodiversity along with Fighting Climate Changes: Study

the forests which are inside the reserves and the ones in areas outside the borders of the reserves, provide complex canopy which include the leaves and branches

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habitat of pandas
A panda nibbles on a bamboo shoot. Pixabay
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  • The research noted that forests outside of reserves often grow faster than the ones inside the reserves
  • It was also discovered by the researchers that forests in the lower elevation zones which are not primarily meant for the habitat for pandas, are not being protected properly yet

Washington DC, July 02, 2017: Pandas are adorable creatures! Conserving these animals can also enrich biodiversity along with fighting climate changes, a new study has revealed.

According to the reports of ANI, the study leads to a course going beyond pandas to more beneficial ways of conservation.

Jianguo “Jack” Liu from the Michigan State University in East Lansing, US, stated “Sometimes unintended consequences can be happy ones – and give us ways to do even better as we work toward sustainability.” She further added, “Pandas are leading us to even greater ways to care for nature and health of humans and the planet,” ANI reported.

ALSO READ: With captive Giant Pandas living longer than ever, list of their physical and even Emotional needs is growing

Another researcher Andres Viña said, “Reserves are created thinking about the pandas – but we wanted to see if they provide more benefits than just the pandas.”

Liu and Viña discovered that due to the slow metabolism rate and the limited diet of these animals, bamboo is lacking in nutritional density, and pandas need large forests for their survival.

According to the reports, the forests which are inside the reserves and the ones in areas outside the borders of the reserves, provide complex canopy which include the leaves and branches, soaking up carbon dioxide- a greenhouse gas that heavily affects climate change.

The research noted that forests outside of reserves often grow faster than the ones inside the reserves. But according to Vina, that isn’t a downfall of reserves.

Viña further stated that it would be great to allow more space between the planted trees and include different varieties to grow as well for more robust forests, in future, ANI has reported.

It was also discovered by the researchers that forests in the lower elevation zones which are not primarily meant for the habitat for pandas, are not being protected properly yet. She stated “We are seeing efforts that are moving in the right direction and showing positive results for nature and for humans. Now it’s time to continue those efforts and fine tune them to continue to get even more benefits.”

Reportedly, the study has been published in journal Ecosphere.

– prepared by Antara Kumar of NewsGram. Twitter: @ElaanaC
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Brazil Cut Its Greenhouse Gas Emission Levels Lower Than 2020 Emission Goals

The 2020 emission goals were set out in the 2009 Copenhagen Accord to combat climate change. Under the more ambitious Paris Agreement in 2015 on climate change, Brazil has set goals for further steep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions for 2025 and 2030.

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Deforestation, Brazil
Brazil Surpasses 2020 Target to Cut Deforestation Emissions. Flickr

Brazil cut its greenhouse gas emissions from deforestation in 2017 to levels below its internationally agreed 2020 climate change targets, the country’s Environment Ministry said Thursday.

Brazil reduced its emission from deforestation in the Amazon rainforest by 610 million tons of carbon dioxide (CO2), compared to its 2020 target of 564 million tons. In the Cerrado savanna, emissions were reduced 170 million tons of carbon dioxide versus a target of 104 million tons.

The Amazon, the world’s largest tropical rainforest, and the Cerrado, South America’s biggest savanna, soak up vast amounts of carbon dioxide, and their preservation is seen as vital to the fight against climate change.

Brazil reduced its emission from deforestation in the Amazon rainforest. Pixabay
Brazil reduced its emission from deforestation in the Amazon rainforest. Pixabay

But destruction of the forest releases large quantities of CO2, one of the main greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. Large-scale Amazon deforestation has made Brazil one of the world’s top greenhouse gas emitters, because of fires and the spread of agriculture and cattle ranching.

The 2020 emission goals were set out in the 2009 Copenhagen Accord to combat climate change. Under the more ambitious Paris Agreement in 2015 on climate change, Brazil has set goals for further steep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions for 2025 and 2030.

Also Read: Nature in Danger: Deforestation Climbs High

“The policy message is that we can and should remain in the Paris Agreement (because) it is possible to effectively implement the commitments that have been made,” said Thiago Mendes, secretary of climate change in the Environment Ministry. (VOA)