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Conserving Pandas can Enrich Biodiversity along with Fighting Climate Changes: Study

the forests which are inside the reserves and the ones in areas outside the borders of the reserves, provide complex canopy which include the leaves and branches

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habitat of pandas
A panda nibbles on a bamboo shoot. Pixabay
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  • The research noted that forests outside of reserves often grow faster than the ones inside the reserves
  • It was also discovered by the researchers that forests in the lower elevation zones which are not primarily meant for the habitat for pandas, are not being protected properly yet

Washington DC, July 02, 2017: Pandas are adorable creatures! Conserving these animals can also enrich biodiversity along with fighting climate changes, a new study has revealed.

According to the reports of ANI, the study leads to a course going beyond pandas to more beneficial ways of conservation.

Jianguo “Jack” Liu from the Michigan State University in East Lansing, US, stated “Sometimes unintended consequences can be happy ones – and give us ways to do even better as we work toward sustainability.” She further added, “Pandas are leading us to even greater ways to care for nature and health of humans and the planet,” ANI reported.

ALSO READ: With captive Giant Pandas living longer than ever, list of their physical and even Emotional needs is growing

Another researcher Andres Viña said, “Reserves are created thinking about the pandas – but we wanted to see if they provide more benefits than just the pandas.”

Liu and Viña discovered that due to the slow metabolism rate and the limited diet of these animals, bamboo is lacking in nutritional density, and pandas need large forests for their survival.

According to the reports, the forests which are inside the reserves and the ones in areas outside the borders of the reserves, provide complex canopy which include the leaves and branches, soaking up carbon dioxide- a greenhouse gas that heavily affects climate change.

The research noted that forests outside of reserves often grow faster than the ones inside the reserves. But according to Vina, that isn’t a downfall of reserves.

Viña further stated that it would be great to allow more space between the planted trees and include different varieties to grow as well for more robust forests, in future, ANI has reported.

It was also discovered by the researchers that forests in the lower elevation zones which are not primarily meant for the habitat for pandas, are not being protected properly yet. She stated “We are seeing efforts that are moving in the right direction and showing positive results for nature and for humans. Now it’s time to continue those efforts and fine tune them to continue to get even more benefits.”

Reportedly, the study has been published in journal Ecosphere.

– prepared by Antara Kumar of NewsGram. Twitter: @ElaanaC
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The connection between Antarctic Volcanic Eruptions and abrupt Climate Change: Study

Joseph McConnell conducted the study

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The connection between Antarctic Volcanic Eruptions and abrupt Climate Change
The connection between Antarctic Volcanic Eruptions and abrupt Climate Change. Pixabay
  • The Climate change that began approximately 17,700 years ago included a sudden poleward shift in the westerly winds encircling Antarctica
  • Joseph McConnell’s ice core laboratory enabled high-resolution measurements of ice cores extracted from remote regions of the Earth, such as Greenland and Antarctica
  • West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide core was drilled to a depth of more than 3,405 meters

New York, USA, September 7, 2017: A series of volcanic eruptions in the Antarctica coincided with increased deglaciation and rise in global greenhouse gas concentrations about 17,700 years ago, says a study.

“Detailed chemical measurements in Antarctic ice cores show that massive, halogen-rich eruptions from the West Antarctic Mt. Takahe volcano coincided exactly with the onset of the most rapid, widespread Climate Change in the Southern Hemisphere during the end of the last ice age,” said Joseph McConnell, Professor at the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Nevada, US.

The Climate Change that began approximately 17,700 years ago included a sudden poleward shift in the westerly winds encircling Antarctica with corresponding changes in sea ice extent, ocean circulation and ventilation of the deep ocean.

Evidence of Climate Change like this is found in many parts of the Southern Hemisphere and in different paleoclimate archives, but what prompted these changes has remained largely unexplained.

“We postulate that these halogen-rich eruptions created a stratospheric ozone hole over Antarctica that, analogous to the modern ozone hole, led to large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation and hydro climate throughout the Southern Hemisphere,” McConnell said.

Furthermore, the fallout from these eruptions – containing elevated levels of hydrofluoric acid and toxic heavy metals – extended at least 2,800 kilometers from Mt. Takahe and likely reached southern South America.

For the study, McConnell’s ice core laboratory enabled high-resolution measurements of ice cores extracted from remote regions of the Earth, such as Greenland and Antarctica.

One such ice core, known as the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide (WAIS Divide) core was drilled to a depth of more than 3,405 meters, and much of it was analyzed in the Desert Research Institute Ultra-Trace Laboratory for more than 30 different elements and chemical species.

Additional analyses and modeling studies critical to support the authors’ findings were made by collaborating institutions around the US and the world.

“These precise, high-resolution records illustrate that the chemical anomaly observed in the WAIS Divide ice core was the result of a series of eruptions of Mt. Takahe located 350 kilometers to the north,” Monica Arienzo, Assistant Research Professor at DRI, said. (IANS)