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Indian Consumers Cautious of Data Misuse Through Technological Devices

Executives in the technology sector believe that their company's information security function is highly engaged with the organization's digital transformation agenda. 

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cyber security
"It's clear that organisations are still prioritising their bottomline ahead of consumer expectations and concerns, despite the opportunity to use effective cyber security strategy to build consumer confidence and engagement," says Akhilesh Tuteja, KPMG Global Co-Leader, Cyber Security. Pixabay

Nearly 86 per cent of the consumers in India are concerned about eavesdropping of their conversations or theft or misuse of their messages through their devices, a KPMG report said on Thursday.

According to KPMG’s “Consumer Loss Barometer” report, the focus of the organisations has to be on building trust with customers in the digital era through adequate cyber security to propel business growth.

Nearly 84 per cent of the consumers in India prefer mobile device usage over apps and cloud.

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While 51 per cent respondents in India believe that additional levels of privacy and security should be embedded within the design of new types of “connected” devices, 59 percent said that it is their own responsibility to ensure the devices you are using have been secured. Pixabay

However, more than 50 per cent of respondents have limited personal information stored on the Cloud primarily due to security and privacy concerns, the findings showed.

The report that surveyed more than 2,000 consumers and 1,800 Chief Information Security Officers (CISOs), identified a mismatch between the priorities of CISOs and consumers in the event of a breach.

“The proliferation of connected and IoT devices will have a cross-sector impact on areas around data security and privacy. In response to this, regulators will need to establish mandatory data security requirements,” said Atul Gupta, Leader-IT Advisory and Cyber Security Leader, KPMG in India.

Executives in the technology sector believe that their company’s information security function is highly engaged with the organization’s digital transformation agenda.

However, only 33 percent of the executives in the automotive sector believed so. A sizeable minority said executives were infrequently briefed on cyber security, with only one per cent of the total number of executives briefed on a monthly basis.

“Security leaders prioritise financial loss (60 per cent), costs of business disruption, recovery, and remediation (51 per cent) and reputational risk (31 per cent) over the impact relationship with consumers (21 per cent),” the report added.

cyber security
According to KPMG’s “Consumer Loss Barometer” report, the focus of the organisations has to be on building trust with customers in the digital era through adequate cyber security to propel business growth.  Pixabay

While 51 per cent respondents in India believe that additional levels of privacy and security should be embedded within the design of new types of “connected” devices, 59 percent said that it is their own responsibility to ensure the devices you are using have been secured.

Also Read: WhatsApp Designs Its Business Communication App for Apple Users

Around 87 percent of the consumers are concerned that retailers will misuse or improperly distribute their information.

“It’s clear that organisations are still prioritising their bottomline ahead of consumer expectations and concerns, despite the opportunity to use effective cyber security strategy to build consumer confidence and engagement,” says Akhilesh Tuteja, KPMG Global Co-Leader, Cyber Security. (IANS)

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Apple’s Recycling Robot Is Capable of Disassembling 200 iPhones Per Hour

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills. 

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Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year. Pixabay

 Apple on Thursday announced to expand its global recycling programmes and introduced Daisy, its recycling robot that is capable of disassembling 200 iPhones per hour.

US customers can send their iPhones to be disassembled by Daisy which is 33 feet long, has five arms and can methodically deconstruct any of 15 iPhone models.

Daisy will disassemble and recycle select used iPhones returned to Best Buy stores throughout the US and KPN retailers in the Netherlands, the company said in a statement ahead of Earth Day that falls on April 22.

apple
For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain. Pixabay

Apple also announced the opening of its “Material Recovery Lab” dedicated to discovering future recycling processes in Austin, Texas.

The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges.

“Advanced recycling must become an important part of the electronics supply chain, and Apple is pioneering a new path to help push our industry forward,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives.

Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year.

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills.

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The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges. Pixabay

Daisy can take apart iPhones to recover materials such as cobalt, aluminum and tin, which are then recycled back into the manufacturing process.

Once materials have been recovered by Daisy, they are recycled back into the manufacturing process.

Also Read: Parkinson Treatment Possible Through A Blood Pressure Drug

For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain.

They are then combined with scrap from select manufacturing sites and, for the first time, cobalt recovered through this process is now being used to make brand-new Apple batteries. (IANS)