Sunday March 24, 2019

Consuming 4 Cups of Coffee Daily May Help Boost Heart Functions in Elderly

The team found that caffeine was protective against heart damage in pre-diabetic, obese mice, and in aged mice

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Hot coffee contains more antioxidants than cold coffee. Pixabay

Drinking four cups of coffee daily might be a healthy addiction, especially in older adults, as it can enhance the function of heart cells as well as help recover from heart attacks, say researchers.

The study, conducted on mice showed that coffee promotes movement of a regulatory protein into mitochondria — cell powerhouse — which then enhances their function to protect cardiovascular cells from damage.

The protein called p27, an inhibitor of the cell cycle, was present in mitochondria in the major cell types of the heart.

In these cells, mitochondrial p27 promoted migration of endothelial cells, protected heart muscle cells from cell death and triggered the conversion of fibroblasts into cells containing contractile fibres — all crucial for repair of heart muscle after myocardial infarction or heart attack, and did so at a concentration that is reached in humans by drinking four cups of coffee, the researchers said.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“Our results indicate a new mode of action for caffeine, one that promotes protection and repair of heart muscle through the action of mitochondrial p27,” said Judith Haendeler from Heinrich-Heine-University’s Medical Faculty in Germany.

“…enhancing mitochondrial p27 could serve as a potential therapeutic strategy not only in cardiovascular diseases but also in improving health span,” she added.

Also Read: Californian Court Warns “Coffee causes Cancer!”

In the study, published in the journal PLOS Biology, the team found that caffeine was protective against heart damage in pre-diabetic, obese mice, and in aged mice.

“These results should lead to better strategies for protecting heart muscle from damage, including consideration of coffee consumption or caffeine as an additional dietary factor in the elderly population,” Haendeler said. (IANS)

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Having a Handful of Nuts Everyday Can Boost Memory in Elderly, Says Study

According to the World Health Organization, the number of people living with dementia globally is at 47 million

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Representational image. Pixabay

While age is known as the strongest risk factor for cognitive decline, eating a handful of nuts every day can improve mental health and memory skills by up to 60 per cent, finds a study.

The findings showed that consuming nuts for a long period of time could be the key to better cognitive health, including improved thinking, reasoning and memory in older people.

“By eating more than 10 grams (or two teaspoons) of nuts per day older people could improve their cognitive function by up to 60 per cent — compared to those not eating nuts — effectively warding off what would normally be experienced as a natural two-year cognition decline,” said lead researcher Ming Li from the University of South Australia.

The reason could be because peanuts have specific anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects that help reduce cognitive decline including dementia.

Nuts are also known to be high in healthy fats, protein and fibre with nutritional properties that can lower cholesterol and improve cognitive health.

The study, published in The Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, included 4,822 Chinese adults aged 55 and above.

Almonds and other nuts can improve survival of patients suffering from colon cancer as well.

According to the World Health Organization, the number of people living with dementia globally is at 47 million.

By 2030, this is projected to rise to 75 million and by 2050, global dementia cases are estimated to almost triple.

“Population ageing is one of the most substantial challenges of the twenty first century,” Li said.

“Not only are people living longer…they naturally experience changes to conceptual reasoning, memory, and processing speed.

Also Read- Excess Male Hormones in Women May up Blindness Risk: Study

“While there is no cure for age-related cognition decline and neurogenerative disease, variations in what people eat are delivering improvements for older people.

“If we can find ways to help older people retain their cognitive health and independence for longer – even by modifying their diet – then this is absolutely worth the effort,” Li suggested. (IANS)