Wednesday October 16, 2019

Consuming this Bacteria May Cut Risk of Heart Diseases

This research would limit cardiovascular risks and therefore potentially have an impact on half of the population, if properly used, researchers said

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air pollution, cardiovascular diseases, hypertension
Hypertension and metabolic syndrome are important causes of stroke, the researchers said. Pixabay

Researchers have discovered that the use of a pasteurised form of Akkermansia muciniphila-an intestinal bacteria provides greater protection from various cardiovascular disease risk factors.

According to the findings published in the journal Nature Medicine, the research team from the University of Louvain developed a clinical study in order to administer the bacteria to humans.

For the study, 40 participants were enrolled and 32 completed the trial. The researchers administered Akkermansia to overweight or obese participants, all displaying insulin resistance (pre-diabetes type 2) and metabolic syndrome, in other words, having several elevated risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

The participants were randomly divided into three groups — placebo group, those taking live bacteria and those taking pasteurised bacteria — and were asked not to change their dietary habits or their physical activity. Akkermansia was provided as a nutritional supplement.

The primary goal of the study was to demonstrate the feasibility of ingesting Akkermansia daily for three months, without risk.

Physical activity
“Many of us tend to think cardiovascular disease hits in older age, but arteries begin to stiffen when we are very young,” said study lead author Nicole Proudfoot from McMaster University in Canada. Pixabay

The researchers observed excellent compliance – the supplements were easy to ingest and there were no side effects in the groups taking live or pasteurised bacteria.

According to the study, the tests in humans confirm what had already been observed in mice. Ingestion of the (pasteurised) bacterium prevented the deterioration of the health status of the subjects (pre-diabetes, cardiovascular risks).

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Even better, the researchers observed a decrease in inflammation markers in the liver, a slight decrease in the body weight of the subjects (2.3 kg on average) as well as a lowering of cholesterol levels.

In contrast, the metabolic parameters (insulin resistance or hypercholesterolemia) in placebo subjects continued to deteriorate over time.

This research would limit cardiovascular risks and therefore potentially have an impact on half of the population, if properly used, researchers said. (IANS)

Next Story

Here’s How Gut Bacteria Absorbs Fat Leading to Weight Gain

A team of US researchers have found a molecule that helps synchronize the absorption of nutrients in the gut with the rhythms of the Earth's day-night light cycle

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health, weight gain, gut, bacteria
Those cells act as intermediaries between bacteria that aid in digestion of food and proteins that enable absorption of nutrients. Pixabay

A team of US researchers have found a molecule that helps synchronize the absorption of nutrients in the gut with the rhythms of the Earth’s day-night light cycle — a discovery that has far-ranging implications for obesity in affluent countries and malnutrition in impoverished countries.

Dr Lora Hooper and her research team at UT Southwestern found that the good bacteria that live in the guts of mammals programme the metabolic rhythms that govern the body’s absorption of dietary fat.

The team also found that microbes programme these so-called circadian rhythms by activating a protein named “histone deacetylase 3” (HDAC3), which is made by cells that line the gut.

Those cells act as intermediaries between bacteria that aid in digestion of food and proteins that enable absorption of nutrients.

The microbiome actually communicates with our metabolic machinery to make fat absorption more efficient.

“But when fat is overabundant, this communication can result in obesity. Whether the same thing is going on in other mammals, including humans, is the subject of future studies,” said lead author Dr Zheng Kuang, a postdoctoral fellow in the Hooper’s laboratory in the study published in the journal Science.

The study, done in mice, revealed that HDAC3 turns on genes involved in the absorption of fat.

They found that HDAC3 interacts with the biological clock machinery within the gut to refine the rhythmic ebb and flow of proteins that enhance absorption of fat.

health, weight gain, gut, bacteria
the good bacteria that live in the guts of mammals programme the metabolic rhythms that govern the body’s absorption of dietary fat. Pixabay

This regulation occurs in the daytime in humans, who eat during the day, and at night in mice, which eat at night.

“Our results suggest that the microbiome and the circadian clock have evolved to work together to regulate metabolism,” said Hooper.

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Disrupting the interactions between the microbiota and the body’s clock could make us more likely to become obese.

“These disruptions happen frequently in modern life when we take antibiotics, work overnight shifts, or travel internationally. But we think that our findings might eventually lead to new treatments for obesity – and possibly malnutrition – by altering the bacteria in our guts,” the researchers mentioned. (IANS)