Saturday December 7, 2019

Consumption of Coffee May Reduce MetS: Study

Drinking coffee may reduce heart disease risk

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Coffee-reduce MetS
Coffee has been proven to reduce MetS. Pixabay

Coffee consumption is associated with reduced risk of metabolic syndrome (Mets), say researchers adding that MetS increases the risk of cardiovascular problems, including coronary heart disease and stroke.

According the study, Assistant Professor Giuseppe Grosso from the University of Catania, Italy, reviewed his own scientific research on the association between coffee consumption and MetS in Polish and Italian cohorts and explored the potential mechanistic perspectives behind the inverse association.

His research suggests that polyphenols contained in coffee may be involved in the inverse association, specifically phenolic acids and flavonoids.

He also reviewed research that suggests that moderate coffee consumption is associated with a reduction of CVD, cancer, all-cause mortality and type 2 diabetes.

For the findings, Associate Professor Estefania from Toledo University of Navarra, Spain, reviewed meta-analyses considering associations between coffee consumption and MetS and discussed work in a Mediterranean cohort.

Her research involved 22,000 people and specifically considered caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.

Reducing MetS- coffee
Average consumption of coffee can reduce the risk of heart diseases by reducing MetS. Pixabay

The study concluded that moderate coffee consumption (one to four cups per day) was associated with reduced risk of MetS, whilst higher intakes were not.

This was reported for both regular and decaffeinated coffee.

The inverse association between coffee consumption and metabolic syndrome was shown in both men and women, said the study.

Also Read- Women Affected The Most By Environmental Stress: Study

Meta-analyses also found that a moderate consumption of both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee may be associated with a reduced risk of metabolic syndrome.

The study was presented at the 13th European Nutrition Conference organised by the Federation of European Nutrition Societies (FENS) in Dublin, Ireland. (IANS)

Next Story

Blood Test Can Identify Risk of Night-Time High Blood Pressure in People

Most people experience lower blood pressure at night

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Blood Test
A simple Blood Test administered at the beginning of a sleep study could indicate each patient's cardiovascular risk, said the study. Pixabay

Researchers have found that a simple Blood Test can help identify people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who are at higher risk of cardiovascular problems because of a phenomenon called “reverse dipping” that causes blood pressure to rise rather than lower during sleep.

Most people experience lower blood pressure at night. The new study, published in the European Respiratory Journal suggests a potential cause for reverse dipping that may help patients with sleep apnea get the help they need before cardiovascular disease develops.

“We can now identify those with OSA at the highest risk of cardiovascular problems in order to prevent them from developing additional complications,” said David Gozal from the University of Missouri School of Medicine in the US.

“We can treat those patients more aggressively to ensure they adhere to therapy and use their continuous positive airway pressure device (CPAP) properly,” Gozal said.

The researchers studied 46 patients diagnosed with OSA. They ranged in age from 18 to 70. Fifteen participants were identified to have a rise in blood pressure during sleep, while the remaining 31 participants had blood pressure readings that either remained the same or declined at night.

The researchers collected a blood sample from each participant to study the messages cells produce and send to each other through microscopic packages called exosomes.

Blood Test
Researchers have found that a simple Blood Test can help identify people with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) who are at higher risk of cardiovascular problems because of a phenomenon called “reverse dipping” that causes blood pressure to rise rather than lower during sleep. Pixabay

“We found that the cell messages coming from participants with night-time elevated blood pressure were different than those transmitted in subjects with normal blood pressure,” Gozal said.

“The altered messages caused the cells that line the blood vessels to become dysfunctional. Those disturbed vessels allowed inflammatory cells to enter the vessels’ walls, causing hardening of those vessels and leading to cardiovascular disease.”

ALSO READ: Kids Born Through C-Section At Low Obesity Risk

Gozal said the cell message discovery will help clinicians personalise treatment for each patient diagnosed with OSA.

A simple blood test administered at the beginning of a sleep study could indicate each patient’s cardiovascular risk, said the study. (IANS)