Tuesday June 25, 2019

Consumption of Junk Food Responsible for Allergies in Children, Finds Research

For the study, the research team observed 61 children aged between 6 and 12 years

0
//
junk food
The study revealed a significant correlation between AGEs and junk food consumption, said Roberto Berni Canani, Associate Professor at the University of Naples Federico II in Italy. Pixabay

Researchers have found that high consumption of junk food such as microwaved foods and barbequed meats may be responsible for food allergies in children.

The study, presented at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology and Nutrition, shows that high levels of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are associated with food allergies in kids.

AGEs are present in high levels in junk foods such as sugars, processed foods, microwaved foods and roasted or barbequed meats. They are known to play a role in the development and progression of different oxidative-based diseases including diabetes, atherosclerosis and neurological disorders, said the researchers.

junk food
Junk Food is highly rich in Cholesterol. Pixabay

ALSO READ: Study: Lack of Sleep Associated with Wide Range of Mental Health Issues in Students, Athletes

For the study, the research team observed 61 children aged between 6 and 12 years. They were identified in three categories – those with food allergies, those with respiratory allergies and healthy controls.

The study revealed a significant correlation between AGEs and junk food consumption, said Roberto Berni Canani, Associate Professor at the University of Naples Federico II in Italy. (IANS)

Next Story

Australian National University Study Warns Link Between Fast Food and Dementia

Dementia is the leading cause of death in Australian women, while for men it is second only to heart disease

0
junk food, fast food
A combination hamburger served in Pyongyang, North Korea, June 12, 2018. A new Australian study links fast food, like burgers, to dementia. VOA

Research from the Australian National University (ANU) is warning of a link between the extra calories in a fast-food burger and brain diseases, including dementia.

People are “eating away at their brain with a really bad fast-food diet and little to no exercise,” the lead author of the study said. The ANU study also reinforces the link between type 2 diabetes, which is often triggered by obesity, and the rapid deterioration of brain function.

Dementia is the leading cause of death in Australian women, while for men it is second only to heart disease.

junk food
The study revealed a significant correlation between AGEs and junk food consumption, said Roberto Berni Canani, Associate Professor at the University of Naples Federico II in Italy. Pixabay

A clear link

Researchers believe there is a clear link between the deterioration of the brain and an unhealthy diet as well as a lack of exercise. There is a warning that highly processed fast food that is cheap, widely available and loaded with calories, sugar and fat is leading to significant harm.

The study from the ANU says that the damage to the brain is almost certainly irreversible once a person reaches middle age. Professor Nicolas Cherbuin says lifestyle choices really do matter.

“Poorer diet leads to the development of obesity,” he said. “It is compounded by the lack of physical activity, it leads to an increased level of inflammation in our body, which when it is [in] response to trauma is a good thing. But when it is constantly there it creates damage. It also kills neurons, so it affects our brain function and it leads to ultimately a greater risk of developing dementia later in life.”

junk food
Junk Food. Wikimedia Commons

ALSO READ: High Consumption of Junk Food May Spike up Allergies in Children

A third of adults overweight, obese

The research says that about a third of the world’s adult population is either overweight or obese. The advice is to eat well and exercise from a young age. It is estimated that dementia affects almost 50 million people worldwide, and the global cost of the brain syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease, is more than $800 billion.

At present there is no prevention or cure for most forms of dementia. However, some medication has been found to reduce some symptoms. (VOA)